Tag Archives: student debt

America Saves Week: Pay Off High Interest Debt

3 Mar

In 2012, 71 percent of students who graduated 4-year colleges took out student loans. Debt isn’t fun, but education is one of the better reasons to take on debt. While you may not enjoy paying back student loans there are some steps you can take to save yourself some money and make your payments hurt a little bit less.

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  1. Prioritize high-interest debt: While Federal Direct student loans are capped at 6.8%, private loans are not. Even worse interest rates? Credit cards. If you have credit card debt, prioritize paying it off before your student loans. 6.8% interest is no fun, but credit card interest rates 20% and higher can be crippling.
  2. Income based repayment: If you qualify for an income-based repayment (IBR) plan, do yourself a favor and apply for one. Generally if your debt is higher than your income you will probably qualify. Even if you are able to make your payments without much issue, an IBR can still save you money. How you may ask? If you keep paying the same amount you did before, you can target your payments toward either your highest interest or smallest loans depending on which repayment style fits you. Not to mention, if you are one of the approximately 50% of people who work in public service, you can qualify for loan forgiveness after 10 years.

Pick your payoff: There are two main methods for paying off debt when you have multiple balances to pay. The snowball and the avalanche method.

The snowball method entails taking the extra money you have and paying off your smallest debts first while paying the minimum on the rest. Then once that is taken care of, you roll that payment into the next smallest and knock off your obligations one-by-one. This is best for those who like the reward of seeing their different loans disappear the quickest and can help you stay on track easier.

The avalanche method is similar to the snowball where you make minimum payments on all loans but one. The difference is that you target the highest interest rates first. While you may not experience the visual rewards of seeing the small debts disappear quicker, you will save the most amount of money in the long run this way.

One way to not repay is by spreading out the extra you pay to all debts and pay a little bit additional on everything each month. This provides neither of the advantages that the avalanche and snowball method have while still costing you the same amount. You get less savings than the avalanche, and less of the reward that the snowball offers.

My Student Loan Journey Pt. 2: Climbing the Mountain of Debt

10 Feb

Casey Doten, Financial Aid Administrator – Purdue University

I knew going into college that I’d have to take out student loans to help finance my degree. While getting myself $48,600 into student loan debt was less than ideal for me, I was able to earn my degree. However thanks to the miracle of interest, my student loan debt had increased from the $48,600 that I had borrowed to $54,800 by the time that I began repayment.

The scary part? That $54,000 could have been even higher. Thankfully I had a couple of things going in my favor that helped to prevent that. A good portion of my federal loans are subsidized and did not accrue interest during school. I also had a loan which required me to make quarterly payments to help keep the interest from adding up (unfortunately these payments always hit me at the worst times in college). Had I not had either of those two factors, my loan debt would have been $59,900 when I finally started repayment.

So how have I gone about tackling this $54,800 debt? Being honest, it hasn’t been perfectly approached at all times but after a few initial mistakes I’ve come up with a plan and am paying it off as quickly as I can.

my student loan journey 2.jpgMaking mistakes early on

During my grace period of six months between graduation and my first payments becoming due, I had saved up a little money working two part-time jobs, but I never put anything toward my loans. As my grace period ended, I was able to get a full-time job along with working ten or so hours a week on the side.

So in November my repayment officially began. I had always heard people say “If you can afford to pay a little extra on your student loans, you should do it”. Getting rid of my student loans was a priority for me, so even though I wasn’t exactly swimming in money I paid extra on my loans. If my payment was $115 for a loan, I’d pay $150. The problem is that my approach of paying a little extra on every loan per month was one of the least efficient ways possible.

Pay more on loans with higher interest rates

What I should have been doing was approaching my repayment with a real plan rather than just tossing a few extra bucks at it.

I learned about the avalanche and snowball debt payment methods from some friends and after some research realized I could take my loans head-on with a plan. I started paying the minimum on every one of my loans except the one with the highest interest rate where I put all that extra money I had previously spread out between the other loans.

Using this avalanche method, I paid on the highest interest loan and then when that was finished up I took that money and started paying it to the next highest interest loan. This approach helps me pay the least amount of total interest possible.

Understand options & repayment plans

Despite the fact that I’ve been able to meet my monthly loan payments, I realized decided to enroll in an income based repayment plan. This brought my monthly payments on my federal loans down from over $300 to around $70 each month. Why did I choose an income based repayment plan when I wasn’t having troubles making my repayment? I found out that having a lower amount due each month could both help my repayment plan and allow me to be more flexible in my finances.

For my repayment, it allowed me to pay less on several of my loans and kept interest from my subsidized loans from accruing (the interest can be covered for up to three years). I took the $230 I wasn’t obligated to pay to all of my loans and rolled it into the extra I had already been putting toward my highest interest loan.

The other perk was that it gave me a lot more financial flexibility, so if unexpected events popped up I could just pay the minimum on my loans and use the money I would have paid to cover whatever emergency happened.

Luckily I never ended up needing this and I have been able to double down on my avalanche repayment and target my highest interest loan with the money I would have been paying otherwise been spreading out to my other loans.

Make payments right away… or make them automatic

Before I started making my loan payments, I felt like I was making just enough money to get by. I didn’t believe I could find $600 per month just for student loans, let alone money to pay ahead. The secret that I found was to make my student loan payments right away once I got paid. Rather than having to worry about what is left to make my loan payments, I prioritized them and made the extra payments part of my mandatory bill paying routine at the beginning of each month. I also found out that one of my private loans and my federal loans offered a small interest rate reduction for enrolling in automatic payments, which I promptly enrolled in to reduce the total interest I would pay over the loans’ lifetimes.

Roll over other debts

During my first year and a half of repayment, two things events had an effect on my debt: my college beater Jeep died on my commute to work forcing me to buy a different vehicle, and I got proposed to my then-girlfriend, now wife. This gave me another $450 per month in payments to make between the car and ring. This squeezed my personal budget to as thin as it could possibly get, but I still made sure to prioritize getting these payments in right away after getting paid. I realized I that I could make this new budget work, so after paying both off I took $350 of that and rolled it into my student loan payments helping me accelerate my impending pay-off even further.

Where I’m at Today

As of this moment, I still have $42,246.38 left to go. I’ve made great progress but I’m still paying over $200 every month on interest alone. It can be depressing to realize how much I’m losing every month to interest, but I know that my current life wouldn’t be possible without the degree I earned and the experiences I had. Rather than concentrating on how far I have to go, I prefer to reflect on how amazing it feels to know that I’ve paid my loans down more than $12,500 in student loan debt in 27 months in addition to over $9,000 between my car and wife’s engagement ring. The end might not be near but that doesn’t stop me from taking one step at a time toward being student debt free.

Becoming Credit-Wise: What Students (and You!) Should Know

5 Dec

Note: The following article was written for Financial Aid administrators, but has information that is useful to anyone looking to learn about credit.

By Jeff Hanson, Director of Borrower Education Services, Access Group Published by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA)

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As a financial aid administrator, you know your students need to understand their student loans and manage their spending well. Understanding how credit works is an essential part of that, especially for students who must supplement their federal loans with private, credit-based loans.But do your students— and you—really know enough to be truly “credit-wise”? Students may know the basics, such as having the highest credit score possible will help them get credit at an affordable price. But do they know what it takes to get a high credit score (say 800 or more)? And that most students probably score far below this number? Do they know that their credit score can impact the cost of credit, their ability to obtain other financial products such as auto insurance, or their employability? And what happens when they miss a payment or start accumulating credit card debt—how much can this lower their score? Students should never underestimate the value of good credit. Those who need private education loans, as increasing numbers of students do, will find that their credit history is likely to affect their ability to obtain the needed funds, and can even affect the cost of their loans. The better the student’s credit, the greater the probability that he or she will get the loan, and the lower the cost of that loan. Good credit does count! Building up a good credit history comes from understanding how credit reporting and credit scoring work, and from practicing sound financial habits.

Credit Reports

A credit report is a summary of the information contained in an individual’s credit history, which creditors use to evaluate the likelihood that the individual will repay future loans. A credit history is generated from credit account information and payment records that creditors have reported to authorized credit reporting agencies, so anyone who has at least one credit card, a consumer loan (such as a car loan), student loans, or any other form of personal credit should have a credit history with an authorized credit reporting agency (see the list at the end of the article). In essence, credit reports provide a sense of an individual’s willingness to repay a loan, based on his or her past credit performance. Students can think of their credit report as their “credit transcript.” Whether students think they have credit problems or not, it’s a good practice for them to review their credit reports from each of the three national credit reporting agencies at least once a year to be certain that all reported information is accurate. In fact, the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003, Pub. L. 108-159, 117 Stat. 1952 (FACT Act) entitles all consumers to obtain a free copy of their credit report upon request from each of the three agencies once every 12 months. More information about obtaining these free reports is available from the Annual Credit Report Request Service at www.annualcreditreport.com or by calling 887-322-8228.

Credit Scores

If the credit report is the credit transcript, the credit score is the “credit GPA,” and just as with grades, the higher the better. The credit score is a numerical value based on credit account information in a person’s credit report that focuses on individual borrower behavior. Unlike the credit history, which consists of raw data, credit scores are measures of future credit risk based on an assessment of that raw data. Credit scoring is a quick, accurate, consistent, and objective method that helps lenders’ quantify how well individuals have managed their credit. The higher the credit score, the greater the statistical likelihood that an individual will repay a future loan on time. Credit scoring was first developed by Fair Isaac Corporation, which created the credit scores used most widely by the credit industry and are often referred to as FICO® scores. Credit scores are calculated using a statistically derived mathematical formula that provides a numeric prediction of credit risk. The formula itself, which is proprietary, was developed by examining the credit reports of millions of people at two points in time (typically 24 months apart).

Factors Affecting Credit Scores

Paying your credit card bills on time each month has the greatest affect on your credit score. However, contrary to popular belief, a flawless payment history is not sufficient for good credit. A number of factors impact your credit score, including:

  • promptness in paying bills;
  • total debt;
  • amount owed on all credit card accounts;
  • age of credit accounts;
  • number of credit card accounts including number of credit inquiries;
  • the proportion of credit card balances to total available credit card limit;
  • number of credit card accounts opened in past 12 months;
  • number of finance accounts; and
  • occurrence of negative factors such as serious delinquency, derogatory public records, past due accounts that have been turned over to collection agencies, bankruptcies, student loan defaults, and foreclosures.

FICO® scores assess all such negative factors in three ways by evaluating:

  • how recently they occurred,
  • their severity, and
  • their frequency.

The more recent the occurrence, the farther the score will drop. The larger the balance affected (severity), the farther the score will drop. And the more frequently such negatives appear on one’s credit history, the farther the score will drop. Two factors that warrant further review are credit inquiries and student loan debt:

Credit Inquiries

Requests for your credit record can also affect your credit score. Only “hard” inquiries made during the past 12 months, however, have a potential negative affect on your score. Hard inquiries are those made by creditors when you apply for a loan or a new credit card. In such cases, you must give permission for your report to be “pulled” (provided to the creditor). All other credit inquiries are “soft” inquiries and are not a factor in scoring. Soft inquiries include:

  • Self inquiries—your requests for a copy of your own credit report or credit score;
  • Promotional inquiries—those made by companies wanting to offer you an opportunity to apply for credit;
  • Administrative inquiries — inquiries made by your current creditors who want to monitor your credit activities, as well as inquiries from the credit-reporting agency that’s maintaining your credit history (this typically occurs when you have disputed an item that’s contained on your credit report); and
  • Inquiries from prospective employers— although they have the right to obtain your credit report with your permission, these inquiries are not for the purpose of obtaining new credit and so do not impact your score.

Student Loan Debt

Student loan debt affects credit scores, but it does not necessarily result in a low credit score unless the borrower has a “thin” credit file. A “thin” file is one that contains three or fewer “trade lines” (credit cards, car loans, etc.). These files are more susceptible to lower scores because they contain less positive information to offset any negative impact of increases in student loan debt. (Note that the majority of Access Group private loan borrowers have more than three trade lines.) As installment debt, student loans typically are viewed more favorably than revolving debt (credit card debt) in credit scoring. However, although increasing installment balances (for example, because of additional student loans) can have a negative impact on credit score, as students advance from year to year in their program of study, payment delinquencies and increasing credit card debt appear to have the greatest negative impact.

Weighing the Factors

The factors affecting credit scores are not equally weighted in the scoring process. As Fair Isaac reports at www.myFICO.com, payment history has more impact—about 35% of the score—than the other factors. Thus, making payments by the due date is very important. Missed payments, one or more delinquent accounts, and serious derogatory items such as student loan defaults, bankruptcy, charge-offs of accounts, etc., can have a significant negative impact on the score. The amount of debt, especially credit card debt, is the next most significant factor, typically accounting for about 30% of the score. Total debt is important, particularly the percentage of revolving credit (credit cards) being used. Utilization is the amount of credit card debt you have as a percentage of your total available credit card limit. The smaller a person’s credit utilization rate, the less likely it is to have a negative affect on the person’s FICO® score. Thus, it is important to keep credit card balances low, since lower is better. But this does not mean credit cards should not be used once in a while. In fact, some minimal use of credit cards can be beneficial to establish a positive payment history. This does not require the accumulation of credit card debt, however. Rather, simply using a credit card occasionally each month for small purchases and paying the credit card bill in full each time will achieve this goal. The other three factors—length of history as measured by the age of your oldest credit account, new credit as measured by the number of new accounts opened and the number of “hard” inquiries made within the past 12 months, and account mix (relative proportion of installment accounts, revolving accounts, finance accounts, etc.) generally have a lesser impact on scoring, but cannot be ignored when managing your credit.

What’s the Score?

Although there are no well-established statistics regarding the average credit scores of college students, 60% of all consumers with established credit histories have FICO® scores above 700 (using a scale of 300 to 850) according to Fair Isaac. Scores above 700 generally are considered to be “good,” and scores above 775 are viewed as “very good” to “excellent” by most lenders. It is possible to estimate what the credit score might be for a typical student. Fair Isaac Corporation and www.Bankrate.com have joined forces to offer an online FICO® Score Estimator, which provides a credit score range, rather than a specific score, at no cost to consumers at www.bankrate.com/finance/credit/what-is-a-fico-score.aspx. Using the basic Fair Isaac methodology, it provides an estimate based on the answers to a brief series of questions about credit use and payment behavior. We used the FICO® Score Estimator to predict likely credit scores for a typical third-year undergraduate, who has both education loans and credit cards, using four scenarios. For the first scenario, this hypothetical student’s credit characteristics are as shown in the table at left.

  1. “No payments missed” scenario. The estimated FICO® credit score range for this individual is 715-765. Lenders would probably consider this person to have a “good” history, and although they might not offer their best interest rate, they are unlikely to deny credit based solely on this credit score. Of course, before extending credit, the lender might also require the borrower to meet a minimum income threshold or provide loan collateral.
  2. “Missed payments” scenario. What happens if the hypothetical student’s credit characteristics change? In this second scenario, suppose the student suddenly becomes delinquent on an account and is 30 days late in making the payment. Assuming this is the only change, the estimated score range drops to 620-670. This would represent an average drop of 90 points, and the borrower’s credit would now be considered only “fair.” The individual would be more likely to have trouble getting some forms of credit, such as a private student loan, on his or her own signature. If credit were granted, it probably would be at a higher interest rate and have other restrictions and/or costs.
  3. Higher credit use scenario. By contrast, suppose the record showed greater utilization of credit cards. Starting from the original “no-payments- missed” scenario, suppose in this third scenario that the amount of credit card debt was at 50% of the available credit limit. The estimated score range drops to 645-695—a “fair” credit rating. This is better than the missed payment scenario, but would still cause an average drop of 70 points in the score from the original scenario. If credit card utilization increases to 90% (credit cards are nearly “maxed out”), the estimated score range drops to 620-670—the same impact as a 30-day delinquency.
  4. Both 30-day delinquency and 90% utilization scenario. If this hypothetical student had both a 30-day delinquency and was at 90% utilization of credit cards, the estimated score range falls to 565-615. This would create serious credit issues for the student and would make it very difficult to obtain most kinds of credit. Thus, two simple missteps— missing a payment and maxing out credit cards—could take our hypothetical student from having good credit to a situation where credit (particularly private education loans) might be very difficult to obtain and much more expensive.

Obtaining Your Credit Score

The easiest way to obtain your FICO® credit score is to go to the Fair Isaac consumer Web site at www.myFICO.com. From this site you can request your FICO® credit scores calculated by the three national credit reporting agencies—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion—and can purchase your FICO® credit score from one, two, or all three of these agencies.

You will receive an explanation of the score, a copy of the credit report that was used to generate that score, and an explanation of the positive and negative factors that are affecting your score. Be aware that your credit score may vary from agency to agency, because the information on your credit report at each agency may differ. More information about credit scores and the scoring process can be found at www.myFICO.com. In addition, the Federal Trade Commission provides consumer information about credit scoring at www.ftc.gov.

Good Credit Really Counts!

To sum up, to get the credit needed, when it’s needed, at an affordable cost, it is essential to understand credit reporting and credit scoring. But knowledge alone is not enough. Being creditwise also requires practicing good habits. The credit tips listed below provide a framework for practicing those good habits and can help students avoid the types of pitfalls illustrated in the hypothetical credit score scenarios presented here. This will help them avoid the frustrations, anxieties, and fears associated with credit problems.

Tips for Maintaining Good Credit

You can use the following tips to help students develop and maintain a strong credit record; one that should allow them to borrow the funds they will need to fulfill their educational dreams and successfully achieve their other long-term goals. In fact, many of these tips probably are good ideas for everyone, not just for students.

  1. Develop and follow an affordable monthly budget.
    Live below your means while you’re a student; learn to stretch your dollars; be thrifty.
  2. Pay all your bills on time.
    Just one late or missed payment can have a noticeable negative impact on your credit score.
  3. Notify your creditors immediately whenever your address changes.
    Typically you can provide information updates by phone or via the creditor’s Web site. But remember, it’s your responsibility to keep them informed.
  4. Minimize your credit card debt.
    Keep credit card balances as low as possible. Do not exceed 30% of your available credit limit.
  5. Avoid charging more on your credit cards than you can afford to repay in full each month.
    Get in the habit of using cash, not credit cards, whenever possible. Credit card debt that carries over from month to month can be very costly and may lower your credit score.
  6. Record every credit card purchase you charge just as you record every check you write.
    Tracking your charges is important so that you always know exactly how much you must repay.
  7. Limit the number of credit card accounts you maintain.
    You probably don’t need more than three major credit card accounts. Avoid opening new department/retail store charge accounts; they typically can only be used at the store that issued the card and they tend to have the highest interest rates of any credit cards.
  8. Be careful about opening new credit card accounts and closing older ones.
    It’s beneficial to have the longest possible credit history to show that you’ve maintained your credit accounts responsibly over time.
  9. Maintain accurate records of your credit accounts. 
    Keep copies of all documents relating to your credit accounts. These documents should include the application, promissory note, account terms and conditions, disbursement and disclosure statements (if applicable), and lender correspondence.
  10. Obtain a copy of your credit report from each of the three national credit-reporting agencies at least once a year and review it for accuracy.

Promptly notify the reporting agency of any errors; it can take several months to correct those errors.

Credit Resources

Credit Reporting Agencies
For more information on credit reporting or to obtain a copy of your credit report, you can contact a credit reporting agency. The three national credit reporting agencies are:

Annual Credit Report Request Service
This service was established by the three national credit reporting agencies in response to the requirements of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions (FACT) Act of 2003, which provides consumers with the right to obtain a free copy of their credit report from each of the three national credit reporting agencies once every 12 months. Visit www.annualcreditreport.com for more information.

Bankrate.com
For information on all aspects of credit and personal finance, visit www.bankrate.com.

Fair Isaac Corporation
For more information on credit scoring or to purchase your credit score and report, visit Fair Isaac’s consumer Web site at www.myfico.com.

Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
For help with credit reporting problems, call 877-382-4357, or visit www.ftc.gov for information and free publications about credit.

Consumer Credit Counseling Service (CCCS)
For help managing your budget or your debt, call 800-388-2227 for the CCCS office nearest you or visit the national Web site at www.nfcc.org.

Note: Contact information for the above resources is provided for information purposes only. This does not constitute an endorsement, by the author, Access Group, or NASFAA, of these entities or the information and services they provide.

Jeffrey E. Hanson is director of borrower education services for Access Group, Inc., in Wilmington, Delaware. Transcript wishes to thank Craig Watts, public affairs manager for Fair Isaac, for his assistance with this article.

Entering Loan Repayment? Tips for Recent Grads

16 Nov

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Whether you’re a recent graduate whose loans are just entering repayment or you have been making payments for several years, there is a very real chance that educational loan payments may be causing you a financial hardship. For recent graduates, there is a lot of info covered in federal exit counseling and it would be easy to have missed some of it.

Loan Servicer Navient has put together a list of their Top 10 Things to do Before You Make Your 1st Loan Payment. The key to successfully repaying your loans with any Loan Servicer is understanding your responsibilities as a borrower and the wide range of tools available to help you throughout repayment. Your Loan Servicer doesn’t want you to default and you definitely don’t want to default on your loans either!

While there isn’t much that can be done about the amount you owe since you’ve already borrowed it, you can still choose from several different options for repayment.  The Institute for College Access and Success created a Top 10 Tips for recent graduates, a handy reference for borrowers.

Unless you chose otherwise, you’re probably enrolled in the Standard Repayment Plan which spreads your payments evenly over 10 years. This is both the default plan as well as the most aggressive repayment option available. However, there are several other options a borrower can choose which can limit the repayment per month to 10% of  discretionary income and reduce payments to as little as zero dollars per month (depending on income). For more information, check out Acacia Squire’s piece in NPR about her experiences and what options may be available to you.

 

 

FAFSA: Who, What, When, How & Why?

26 Jan

fafsa
Getting you through FAFSA, one question at a time.FAFSAQs

 

  • Who

    • Who Should File a FAFSA?
      If you are interested in getting any Federal Financial Aid, including federal direct loans, you need to file the FAFSA at www.fafsa.gov/  to become eligible. Federal loans are almost always preferable to private loans.  In addition, many colleges’ need-based scholarships rely on FAFSA information to verify that you are eligible. In short, everyone should file the FAFSA – even if you don’t think you’ll qualify for any federal aid

     

    • Whose Information is Needed to File a FAFSA?
      This answer depends on if you are a dependent student or not. Unsure if you’re Dependent or Independent? Check here.(Note: this is not the same as being independent for tax filing)Dependent students: You need tax information for both you AND your parents. If your parents are divorced, you need the information on whoever you receive the most support (51%) from.

      Independent students: You only need your own information unless you are married. If so, you will need your spouse’s information as well.

  • What

     

     

    • What If Things Change After I File The FAFSA?
      If your family situation has a significant change after you’ve filed your FAFSA, and any time while you’re in school, stop by your Financial Aid office to see if you qualify for a “special circumstance”.  These could include job loss, divorce, death of a parent, child birth or other unexpected situations that impact your financial status.

     

    • What Types of Federal Financial Aid are there?
      There are three main types of financial aid:
      1. Grants — Federal Pell Grants do not have to be repaid and are sometimes referred to as “gift aid”.  Grants are similar to scholarships, except that they are often for those who demonstrate financial need, where scholarships can be either merit-based or need-based.2. Student Loans — This is the type you hear about most often.  Filling out the FAFSA is required to be eligible for Federal Direct loans.  Federal loans are almost always preferable to private loans from lending institutions, because they have fixed interest rates and flexible repayment options.3. Federal Work Study (FWS) — Work study may provide you with more opportunities to find on-campus jobs. Rather than being given the funds in the beginning of the semester like loans and grants, FWS earnings are distributed to you as part of your paycheck.
  • Where

     

    • Where Do I Get the School Code and FSA ID?
      You’ll need the school code for whatever schools you are interested in applying to. They are available here. Your FSA ID is used to login and electronically sign your FAFSA.  Set it up at here.

     

    • Where Do I Get Help?
      College Goal Sunday will be held on Sunday, February 21st at 2:00 p.m. in Indiana and it provides FREE FAFSA filing assistance. It is at Ivy Tech in West Lafayette, but to find a location near you in one of the participating 42 states, go to www.CollegeGoalSundayUsa.org.  You can always call the Financial Aid office of your prospective school to ask questions as well.
  • When

    • When Can I start the FAFSA?
      You can begin the FAFSA any time after January 1st of the year you plan to attend college.  The FAFSA uses the student/parent tax information from the previous year. You can estimate the required information to beat a college priority filing date, but the info must be corrected after the taxes are complete!

     

    • When is the FAFSA Due?
      If you are a Purdue student, the FAFSA priority filing date is March 1st, so be sure to have it done by then! Other colleges (and states) have their own priority dates. Check for deadlines here.
  • How

    • How Do I Get my Financial Aid?
      Your financial aid is sent directly to your school and they will apply it directly toward your billing and send any excess aid to you to be used for books and other education related expenses. The exception is Work Study which needs to be earned by working, and is paid via a paycheck.

     

    • How Much is the Maximum That Can be Borrowed?
      Most students don’t know this, but there is a maximum amount of Federal Loans you can take out each year. There is also a maximum amount you can take throughout your college career! If you take the maximum amount for four years, there won’t be as much left for a fifth year if needed. Plan ahead!

      Remember: Everything you borrow you will have to pay back with interest for the next 10 (or more) years. For every $5,000 you borrow at 6% interest, you pay back $6,661.23 over 10 years ($55.51/ month)

    • FAFSA-brw-chart

      Chart courtesy of Penn State University

      
      
  • Why

    • Why Should I Do a FAFSA?
      Other than qualifying for grants and Federal Loans? Many state grants and institutional scholarships require FAFSA information submitted. Even if you aren’t sure, it is always worth submitting!

Estimate College Loan Amounts & Escape the Burden of Debt

20 Mar

Andrew is a writer who contributes his articles to various financial communities, websites, and blogs

 

Such high levels of student loan debt are an impediment to economic growth. It is becoming increasingly difficult for individuals to start their own business, make investments, or purchase homes due to the repayment burden of the loans. Relief from student loan debt will allow these individuals to better manage personal finances. They will be able to direct the funds towards the production of goods and services that are so often asked of them. Rising tuition costs and the necessity of higher education for a better future, forces students to borrow mountainous amounts of debt. This leaves you with one question – What is the correct amount that I should borrow?

The following are important tips you should consider to get help for college.

younger generation asking advise of the older generation

Talk to someone – A student borrower may not have enough experience to make accurate financial decisions on his or her own. A parent, grandparent, or an experienced representative at your school’s Financial Aid Office could enlighten you on the matter.

It is important that you consider only the necessary expenses while deciding on your loan amounts. You have to keep other unnecessary expenses out of the picture to avoid high debt loads. Think about your wants versus your needs!

Focus on your future needs – Just like borrowing extra money is not a good decision, borrowing less money than needed could also create financial troubles. Keep in mind that you have to take care of your expenses once you’re out of college. The extra money borrowed could help you meet your expense needs during college and to some extent, until you find a better source of income.

Don’t ruin your future – You must have certain goals in mind. Carrying a burden of huge student debt could prevent you from achieving those goals. Hence, it is important that you borrow reasonable limits so that your future dreams and plans don’t get stalled right away.

Estimate your monthly debt payments – You have to make monthly payments towards your student loan debt. Try to estimate the monthly debt amount. This way you’ll know whether the monthly debt payments are going to pull your budget and personal finances apart. You should be comfortable paying the monthly debt amount.  You can estimate your monthly student loan payments from online calculators like PayBackSmarter.com.

Getting out from underneath debt

Keep your debt payments lower than your projected income – Don’t borrow more than what you expect to earn. Use salary estimators if you have to, but don’t ever overlook the fact that borrowing more than your future income could mean trouble.  You can find a handy salary estimator at salary.com

Knowing the right loan amount is the key to making the best use of student loans.

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