Tag Archives: scholarship

Scholarship Tips for College of Agriculture Students

7 Jun

Sherre Meyer, Assistant Director Office of Academic Program, College of Agriculture
Career Development and Scholarship Coordinator

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Indiana and National Scholarships are still available to College of Agriculture students for the 2017-18 academic year!

More information on the scholarships can be found at the College of Agriculture’s scholarship page. While scrolling down the webpage, look on the left side of the screen for “Indiana Agriculture Scholarships” and also for “National Agriculture Scholarships“. It takes a little more time to apply as each has their own scholarship application. Every year, many of these scholarships go unawarded, as students do not take the time to apply. Be sure to be mindful of the application deadlines. My advice is to read through each scholarship listed, and for those a student meets the criteria for – apply, apply, and apply!

The application for College of Agriculture Scholarships for 2018-19 will open in November, 2017. Go to the webpage listed above for the application. A common question is “Do I complete an application for each scholarship?” The answer is no, you only need to complete the one application.

One online application puts the College of Agriculture students into a pool for each scholarship for which they meet the criteria. Applications must be completed in their entirety to be considered. Partial and incomplete applications are deleted, so be sure to finish if you start!

Any questions or concerns about the College of Agriculture Scholarships can be directed to me at meyer10@purdue.edu, or call me at 765-494-8482.

 

Financial Aid February: Applying for More Aid

7 Feb

The FAFSA registers you to be considered for aid from Purdue and the federal/state government. To be considered for additional Purdue/private scholarships or private loans, you need to take a few extra steps, such as completing a separate application. Additional information about eligibility and steps to apply for each type of resource are listed below:

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Purdue Departmental Scholarships

Incoming freshmen need to have a complete admissions application submitted by November 1 to be considered for Purdue’s merit scholarships.

In addition to having a complete admissions application by November 1, new students enrolling in one of the following colleges or schools should also complete the Purdue Supplemental Scholarship Application by January 1, 2017.

  • Agriculture
  • Health & Human Sciences
  • Krannert School of Management
  • Polytechnic Institute

The deadline for incoming freshmen to complete the Purdue Supplemental Scholarship Application is January 1st of the year they intend to enroll. The deadline for the 2017-18 school year closed on January 1st, 2017.

Scholarships awarded through the supplemental scholarship application are based on merit, need, or a combination of the two. If you wish to be considered for those scholarships with a need component you will need to file your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the January 1 deadline as well.

Current Students: There are different deadlines for different programs:

  • Agriculture — February 1
  • Chemical Engineering — April 1
  • Health and Human Sciences — January 1
  • Liberal Arts — February 15
  • Management — March 2
  • Polytechnic Institute* — March 1

*Polytechnic Institute Statewide students should complete the Supplement Scholarship Application and select Purdue Polytechnic as their school. Polytechnic Institute Statewide students may complete the application through August. 

What You’ll Do:

Go to the Purdue Supplemental Scholarship Application and follow the directions.

Other Purdue Departmental Scholarships

Some schools and departments use applications other than the Purdue Supplemental Scholarship Application. Find your department below to see if you qualify, and also check to see if you qualify for any other scholarships offered at Purdue.

Click here or on the chart below for access to clickable links!1page-0

Private Scholarships

There are many private scholarships available — especially for incoming freshmen — and you should definitely be applying for these as early as possible. Scholarship opportunities can be found in your local community and nationwide and will have different application processes. However, it is important to be wary of scholarship scams. You should not pay a fee to an organization to find scholarship opportunities for you or to complete an application for a scholarship that is offered.

We recommend talking to a guidance counselor or checking out free resources like FastWeb or scholarships.com to learn about opportunities you may be eligible for.

The Bursar’s Office provides details about mailing checks from donors, how they are applied to your bill, and other processing information for private scholarships that you receive.

Remember to thank the sponsor of your scholarship. Learn more here.

Parent PLUS Loans

A Federal Parent PLUS Loan can be taken out by a parent in the parent’s name to help their dependent undergraduate student help pay for college. This loan has the same interest rate for everyone regardless of credit. For more details and information read about Parent PLUS Loans here.

Private Loans

A large number of private education loan options are available to assist you and your family in meeting college costs. Loan applications are completed with your lender of choice and require good credit or a co-signer with good credit. We recommend applying at least 30 days prior to the date you need the funds and complying quickly to information requests from your lender. Read more about student loans.

What to do over Winter Break?

27 Dec

Hannah Stewart, Purdue University Student and Peer Counselor
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

Santa GIF

Oh thank heaven finals are over! Let the holidays begin! The presents, the food, family, it’s a great time of celebration and enjoyment, for a while at least. I know it’s hard to believe, but there is a lot of downtime over the holidays and some of us, dare I even say it, get bored. Even if you don’t bore easily, there are plenty of actions you can take that just might make your break a little better.

The spring semester is coming. I know the fall semester just ended and no one wants to think about school over a holiday break, but you can at least prepare.

Grandmother giving stock of money for college savingsLook for books in advance; it can often be cheaper since you can order from Amazon, rent online, etc. Write out your Christmas list, you could always ask for books as a Christmas gift! Money usually is given as a gift too and it might be beneficial to save for rent or other college related expenses.  During the downtime of the holidays, it’s a good time to set and make a budget. It’s also a good time to make next semester’s schedule.

Check your grades early. I know you don’t want to think about it, because the past is past, right? However, there are timelines to contest grades. If you have any questionable grades this is the time when you should be reconciling with your professor. Double check to make sure all you grades have been entered correctly and send emails early and often if needed. Also, double check you’re making Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), it is one element to keeping your federal financial aid eligibility. You can always check your SAP status on your myPurdue or contact the Division of Financial Aid as well. Just log in, and under the “financial” tab, click on academic progress on the left, and choose the current academic year. The last tab, Academic Progress, shows your current SAP status.

I cannot stress this enough: the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) openend up October 1st and must be filed every year that you’re in school in order to receive financial aid. TheFAFSA home screen on-time filer deadline for Purdue University is March 1st every year, DON’T MISS OUT! It’s not just grants and scholarships that depend on the FAFSA; if you have Stafford loans they also require filed a FAFSA. Recent FAFSA changes have you using the taxes from 2 years before you file, so if you’re filing for the 2017-18 school year you’ll use 2015 tax information. It also tends to be easier to file the FAFSA when both parents and students can work together, and the holidays usually provide a perfect opportunity. Although filing FAFSA is not as fun as opening presents on Christmas morning, it’s fast and super important, so make sure to pencil in sometime for it.

Another really important thing about this time of year is that it’s when scholarship applications open up for the next academic year. That’s right, free money is up for grabs, so go apply! Academic advisors typically email students letting them know, but you can also check out this list of Purdue departmental scholarship information.  The Division of Financial Aid also has a General Purdue Scholarship Application that is available now and is due (along with a completed FAFSA) by January 1st. Private scholarship applications typically start opening up this time of year too. Two resources for private scholarships are FinAid and FastWeb. So research and apply for scholarships. After all, who doesn’t like free money?

So yes the holidays are here, relax and enjoy yourself! Go have fun and refresh! Just keep these things in mind as they can help for a less stressful spring semester.

Renewing Your Trustees or Presidential Scholarship at Purdue

7 Dec

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If you’re one of the lucky Purdue students to receive a Trustees or Presidential Scholarship, the thought of what you need to do to keep your scholarship may have come up. While these awards do renew automatically, there are some criteria you should know to keep your eligibility.

For starters, you need to complete at least one full academic year in the program (major) that you were originally admitted to. If you decide that you want to change majors, you will have to wait until after the spring semester of your first year or your scholarship will be lost

In addition, you need to maintain continuous full-time enrollment each semester (excluding the summer) with 12 or more credits or you will lose your eligibility. If you are taking 12 credits and drop a class to go below, this will put your scholarship in jeopardy.

While taking 12 credits keeps you full time, there is another credit completion mark you must hit. You must have completed a total of 30 credits at the end of your first year, 60 by the end of your second year and 90 by the end of your third year. Important to note is that transfer and AP credits both apply to this 30/60/90 goal as well as the courses you take at Purdue. This can give you a bit of a cushion, especially in your first year, to hit your 30/60/90 benchmarks. If you started at Purdue before Fall 2014, the 30/60/90 rule does not apply to you.

Along with maintaining full-time enrollment, you need to maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA. These grades are checked at the end of each spring semester and if your cumulative GPA is below 3.0 at that time, you will lose it. However, if you have lost it for one year you can regain it at the end of the next spring semester if your cumulative GPA rises above 3.0 again (assuming you meet all the other renewal criteria).

If you made it through your freshman year without transferring and you’re hitting your 30/60/90 goal while keeping your 3.0 cumulative GPA you’re probably well on your way to graduating in four years. Which is good, because the scholarships are good for up to four years (8 semesters) of eligibility. If you take an extra year or semester past that, you won’t have the scholarship to help out.

If you are participating in a Purdue approved co-op or internship that takes you away from Purdue, that semester will not count against your semester usage, credit hour completion totals, or 12+ credit rules. Due to your different pattern of enrollment, you may appeal to use a semester of your award during the summer. Summer appeals should only be used when you will not be on campus a total of eight fall and spring semesters.

Now, if you have been doing your best but fell short of one or more of these requirements, there is the option to appeal if you have extenuating circumstances. Keep in mind that high school was easy and college wasn’t so you got really into Netflix and sleeping instead is not considered an extenuating circumstance.

Looking for renewal information about other Purdue scholarships including the Emerging Leaders, Marquis, Purdue Achievement, Purdue Hispanic, or Purdue Merit Scholarships? Check out this link with details on maintaining those scholarships. You can also find more information on the Trustees and Presidential Scholarships as well as other Freshman Scholarships here.

Money Mission

5 Jul

Money Mission Logo

Photo provided by Money Mission

Looking to find funding to help you pay for the college experience?  Money Mission is one resource to seek out. Money Mission is a virtual environment where you build an avatar and “live” in an animated village.  Money Mission is a helpful financial literacy simulation created to strengthen your knowledge and relationship with money while learning about scholarship opportunities.  Who says you can’t have fun while applying for scholarships?

Money Mission mascot

Photo provided by Money Mission

As a high school senior and freshman in college, I was always seeking out scholarship opportunities as I had to pay my way through Purdue, and considering out-of-state tuition I needed all the help I could get!  I found Money Mission was an opportunity to engage in an interactive gaming experience where I could create and use my avatar to build credits. I was able to use my saved credits to buy cars and stocks, go to the movies, oh, and yes, spend money on clothes and cell phones all in my virtual world.  Even though I held a job since I was sixteen, I previously knew very little about where my money went, and the simulation gave me the tools to be better at achieving more with my money in real life.  At the end of the game, comes the scholarship competition (yes, another essay) and I have a funny story about my Money Mission scholarship experience.

If you want to play the game and uncover the scholarship opportunities, go to Money Mission.  The portal is through a credit union, but if you can’t find your state or your credit union, just pick any state and credit union and it will allow you access to the game without a lot of sign up hassle.  I hope you have fun.  At the end of each Money Mission session, three times a year, Money Mission participants have the opportunity to apply for cash awards by submitting a brief essay about their experience with Money Mission.  The amounts of the scholarships vary from session to session, so we encourage you to check out the current scholarship rules.

Oh, did I share the punch line?  I wasn’t eligible for the scholarship.  Why?  Because, I helped develop the game by participating in focus groups three years ago when my dad, the game’s author, asked me to help.

But YOU can compete! To start your Money Mission, visit First Financial Credit Union.  Click on the Money Mission icon in the left column.  Read and agree to the Money Mission disclaimer and click “Sign In.”  Then click on “Create an Account” in the lower left corner of the sign in page and follow the prompts.  While registering, please select the Mission Code “Boilermakers.”  You’ll be enjoying your Money Mission in no time!

The choices we make with our money will determine the opportunities we have life! Go BoilerMakers!

Written by: Michaeleen H. Metzner, Student in Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2014

Money Joe Money Mission

Photo provided by Money Mission

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