Tag Archives: scheduling classes

6 Student-Suggested Classes to Fill Your Schedule

12 Oct

class-schedule-fillers-at-purdue.jpg

It’s that time of the year. Your advisors are sending you emails (and then reminder emails) to stop in and have your advising appointment with them. While there are going to be some very specific classes to take, there are other areas where you have some options to fill a requirement for generals or for your college’s core curriculum. Rather than slogging through a semester with courses that aren’t specific to your major and you don’t enjoy, you might as well see what other students suggest right?

While we’ve written about options for class schedule fillers a couple of times before, it’s a question that comes up often. Plus the best suggestions might not fit in your schedule around the classes you absolutely have to take that semester, so having a few options ready only helps.

So here’s 6 suggestions from fellow students on the best classes to take:

EAPS 106 – Geosciences in Cinema:

Learn about some of the most interesting things that nature has to throw at you like tsunamis, volcanoes, and earthquakes and then watch movies about them. As a plus, this may count as your lab science!

Twister.gif

PSY 200 – Introduction to Cognitive Psychology:

A course suggestions that came up several times, Cognitive Psych comes in as a course that’s entertaining and engaging even to non-Psych majors. The lectures were said to be entertaining and that there were several fun guest speakers as well.

PHIL 110 – Introduction to Philosophy:

While this was noted to not be the easiest course available, the student who suggested this course said it was an incredibly engaging course both with the material and the other students. Great for those with a previous foundation in logical reasoning.

SOC 100 – Introduction to Sociology:

In addition to positive reviews overall, this course was mentioned as being one that is still good even when it’s delivered online. That’s a major plus if you’re looking at adding it on to a schedule that’s irregular with labs overlapping normal times or you’re taking it by itself in the summer or Maymester.

FS 591/ HORT 590 – Commercial Grape & Wine Production:

Whether you took the wine appreciation class (FS 470) or just want to go a step further, FS 591 explores both grape growing and wine production with an emphasis on the varieties that thrive in the Midwest. The real fun here is that you get the opportunity to grow your own grapes, smash and ferment them, then finally taste a wine that’s completely of your own making. It’s hard to beat putting theory to practice in such a fun way.

EAPS 301 – OIL!:

The course has a mixture of homework, quizzes and tests but the real quality is that the professor is incredibly passionate about the subject and is helpful in making sure the students understand the subject. Not much more you can ask for in a general course!

MET 349 – Stringed Instrument Design and Manufacture:

One of the more interesting courses available is MET 349 that has a central task of designing and then building an electric guitar. You’ll work on the project throughout the semester and have a finished guitar at the end as long as you do everything properly.

guitar.gif

Setting Up Your Schedule for Next Semester

20 Jun

Welcome Class of 2021!

STAR is a huge step in getting your college career started off. You meet your advisor, and enjoy a few informational sessions, but most importantly you’ll sign up for your first semester of Purdue classes! 1st semester clocktower 22.jpg

Your semester can take shape a lot of different ways depending on how you set your classes up. Things like course difficulty, the times, and how the courses are presented (online, in-person) can all make a huge difference in how your semester goes. So here’s a few things to think about as you’re setting up your first semester of classes:

Coming to college, I never knew that you’re usually only in class for about three or so hours per day depending on your credit load. Even if you spend another three hours a day doing homework or studying like your professors wish, you still probably have more free time than you did in high school. Joining clubs and orgs might eat up your free time quicker than you realize, but you have more choices in how you spend your time than at pretty much any other point in your life.

You may have had classes starting at 7:30 in high school, but if you’re not a morning person definitely look into having your earliest class start a little later in the day. Without having any family members to badger you into waking up, it becomes way too easy to figure you can just catch the lecture online or get the notes from a friend.

If you’re living off campus, you’ll want to try to schedule your classes closely together. On days when the weather doesn’t cooperate (and even days when it does), having to choose between killing two hours on campus versus walking a mile back to your place isn’t a choice you’ll want to make.

Be sure to find time for lunch! Those afternoon classes become a grind if your stomach is rumbling the whole time. Plus, plenty of labs don’t allow food or drink so bringing your own snacks won’t solve the problem. Whether you leave a hole in your schedule or just plan ahead and pack your backpack with some lunch food that you can eat on the go (and doesn’t mind being squished), just having a lunch plan in your routine helps.

Online classes are sometimes thought of as an easy way to get some classes in without having the same time commitment. Unfortunately, if you’re thinking that way you’ll probably get a surprise you don’t like. Online classes often have a lot of busy work and online discussion so the professor knows you’re engaged with the class and comprehending. While they are much more flexible time-wise, they usually take up more free time than an in-person course.

Finally, what to do the rest of the day when you’re not in class? Even if you’re sleeping a mythical 12 hours a night, with three hours of class a day you’ll still have 9 hours remaining that you have your own choice how to spend.

Some students fall into the trap of getting really into Netflix and not a whole lot else. Even the best shows get boring after some time and even for an introvert, just hanging by yourself all the time can become a pretty isolating experience.

This is where clubs and student orgs can fit in. Whether it’s playing a sports club and getting that team bond that you enjoyed from high school sports, joining a professional organization that’s related to your major, something that aligns with your beliefs, or Greek life, there’s tons of great choices. They all want you to join and once you do, you’ll never remember why you had any skepticism about it!

6 Classes to Fill Your Schedule at Purdue

23 Mar

class schedule fillers at purdue.jpg
It’s that time of the year! Making your schedule for next semester and not sure what you should take for those last few credits to get you to full-time? Since our first article for 5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue is one of our most popular blogs, we figured it’s time to offer up a few more student suggested courses for those making their schedule for next semester.

Quick information: full-time can mean a lot of different things for undergraduates. For financial aid, full-time is 12 credits in order to have a full award. For academic purposes, the Registrar also goes off a 12-credit rule for full-time. These two are the same for both fall/spring and summer.  However, for billing purposes flat-rate/ full-time billing begins at 8 credits. So whether you take 8 or 18 credits, your base tuition price is the same (unless you have course fees). Graduate student full-time changes fall/spring versus summer, so this information doesn’t apply to them.

Whether you’re looking for something to fill elective credits, general education requirements or just figure you’ll toss another class in to broaden your horizons, there are tons of course options at Purdue. Here is a sampling that other students have suggested:11082590_10153256154614271_7166009571184015507_n.png

PES 115 (Bowling): You may think Physical Education courses were left in the dust in high school, but the 1-credit PES 115 comes as one of the more highly recommended courses from students. The grading doesn’t go off your actual bowling scores, but rather off your attendance and performance on assignments and quizzes. Extra bonus? You can have Pappy’s delivered to your lane since it’s in the Union.

ENG 232 (J.R.R. Tolkien): Feel like you don’t have time for any fun reading during the semester? Well, this class can combine for-class reading assignments with your favorites! Explore Middle Earth by the books during the week and maybe spend your weekends studying up by watching the trilogies.

HIST 371  (Society, Culture and Rock & Roll/ History of Rock & Roll): Not only is the subject matter exciting, but the real sticking point for this class is that the instructor has incredible passion about the subject and makes it fun for the students. The course usually fills up quickly so if you’re thinking about this one, you’ll want to jump on it!

HORT 360 (Interior Flower Arrangement): While arranging flowers might sounds like it could be sneaky difficult, it comes highly recommended by those who have taken it. Remembering a few facts from high school biology will come in handy, but prior knowledge is not needed. In addition, you end up with an apartment full of fresh flowers and house plants at the end of the course. Note this class has an extra fee so it will cost you extra!

COM 212 (Approaches to the Study of Interpersonal Communication): A communication course that can be taken online may sound strange but it is reality. While it might not sound up your alley, this course doubles as both being enjoyable and being one of the more useful courses post-graduation. For better or worse, being able to communicate well in front of other people is a big part of life after college.

CSR 105 (Personal Finance): One of the courses many people often think should be mandatory in high school due to its importance in everyday life. CSR 105 teaches you about how credit works, paying back student loans, and tax information. It might be the most useful course you take in college for your financial future.

While the courses listed have all been endorsed by current and past students, it’s always worth doing some checking on your end as well. Sometimes instructors or the course material changes can make a big difference. You should also take some time to check out how your potential instructor rates on Rate My Professor and see what comments are left there from other students. While individual reviews aren’t always a fair summary of an instructor, seeing several along the same lines can give you a good idea of what to prepare for.

Have a class you’ve taken that was memorable in a good way? Help spread the word in the comments!

6 Classes to Fill Your Schedule at Purdue

28 Oct

class schedule fillers at purdue.jpg
Making your schedule for next semester and not sure what you should take for those last few credits to get you to full-time? Since our first article for 5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue is one of our most popular blogs, we figured it’s time to offer up a few more student suggested courses for those making their schedule for next semester.

Quick information: full-time can mean a lot of different things for undergraduates. For financial aid, full-time is 12 credits in order to have a full award. For academic purposes, the Registrar also goes off a 12-credit rule for full-time. These two are the same for both fall/spring and summer.  However, for billing purposes flat-rate/ full-time billing begins at 8 credits. So whether you take 8 or 18 credits, your base tuition price is the same (unless you have course fees). Graduate student full-time changes fall/spring versus summer, so this information doesn’t apply to them.

Whether you’re looking for something to fill elective credits, general education requirements or just figure you’ll toss another class in to broaden your horizons, there are tons of course options at Purdue. Here is a sampling that other students have suggested:11082590_10153256154614271_7166009571184015507_n.png

PES 115 (Bowling): You may think Physical Education courses were left in the dust in high school, but the 1-credit PES 115 comes as one of the more highly recommended courses from students. The grading doesn’t go off your actual bowling scores, but rather off your attendance and performance on assignments and quizzes. Extra bonus? You can have Pappy’s delivered to your lane since it’s in the Union.

ENG 232 (J.R.R. Tolkien): Feel like you don’t have time for any fun reading during the semester? Well, this class can combine for-class reading with your favorites! Explore Middle Earth by the books during the week and maybe spend your weekends studying up by watching the trilogies.

HIST 371  (Society, Culture and Rock & Roll/ History of Rock & Roll): Not only is the subject matter exciting, but the real sticking point for this class is that the instructor has incredible passion about the subject and makes it fun for the students. The course usually fills up quickly so if you’re thinking about this one, you’ll want to jump on it!

HORT 360 (Interior Flower Arrangement): While arranging flowers might sounds like it could be sneaky difficult, it comes highly recommended by those who have taken it. Remembering a few facts from high school biology will come in handy, but prior knowledge is not needed. In addition, you end up with an apartment full of fresh flowers and house plants at the end of the course. *Note* this class has an extra fee so it will cost you extra!

COM 212 (Approaches to the Study of Interpersonal Communication): A communication course that can be taken online may sound strange but it is reality. While it might not sound up your alley, this course doubles as both being enjoyable and being one of the more useful courses post-graduation. For better or worse, being able to communicate well in front of other people is a big part of life after college. graph spending plan final crop.jpg

CSR 105 (Personal Finance): One of the courses many people often think should be mandatory in high school due to its importance in everyday life. CSR 105 teaches you about how credit works, paying back student loans, and tax information. It might be the most useful course you take in college for your financial future.

While the courses listed have all been endorsed by current and past students, it’s always worth doing some checking on your end as well. Sometimes instructors or the course material changes can make a big difference. You should also take some time to check out how your potential instructor rates on Rate My Professor and see what comments are left there from other students. While individual reviews aren’t always a fair summary of an instructor, seeing several along the same lines can give you a good idea of what to prepare for.

Have a class you’ve taken that was memorable in a good way? Help spread the word in the comments!

 

5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue

19 Mar

Recommended by Purdue students, compiled by Raysha Duncan, Purdue Alum
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

stack of books

Scheduling classes for the upcoming semester can be stressful whether you’re brand new to the process or if this is the millionth time (exaggerating just a little bit here) you’ve scheduled classes. And if you’re struggling to find one class to fill a scheduling space, that class can make all the difference and reduce class scheduling stress. We polled our peer counselors here at the Division of Financial Aid for suggestions on fun classes. Take a look below! Maybe you will find the class that completes your schedule and reduces your pre-semester stress.

Also be sure to check out our new list of 6 more classes to fill your schedule!

Art and Design (AD) 255: Art Appreciation

One of our peer counselors took this class not only to fulfill a humanities requirement, but because she’s also “really interested in art fields.” It’s a great base for learning about art and while it has “zero to little homework, it’s really important to keep up” to get the most out of the class. The professor was clear and really easy to listen to, so she never felt unprepared. If you’re interested in art at all and need a humanities course, she HIGHLY recommends this course.

Course Objectives:

In this course, you will:

  • gain basic knowledge of art concerning media, vocabulary, themes, and history
  • patronize art establishments, such as galleries and museums (we’ll go as a class once or more)
  • describe and analyze works of art (current chances to see art will be announced in the classroom)
  • increase your aesthetic perception

English (ENGL) 227: Elements of Linguistics

This class is being recommended by an English major.  She just found this class “super interesting” because it pertained to her major and allowed her to learn a new field in the English realm.

William_Shakespeare_1609Subjects Covered:

  • Language: General Features
  • Phonetics/Phonology
  • Morphology
  • Syntax
  • Semantics
  • Pragmatics
  • Language and Languages

Art and Design (AD) 113: Basic Drawing

“A great, but tough class to take”, stated another Purdue Peer Counselor. There are some really great professors and the class provides you with an opportunity to learn some fundamental drawing skills. (It’s also a requirement if you want to move up in any 2-D art courses).

Course Objectives:

  • To develop and strengthen your observational , perceptual skills and creative
  • drawing skills
  • To challenge those skills by providing opportunities to explore a variety of media,
  • practices and concepts.
  • To sharpen your abilities to communicate visually and verbally when making and

analyzing art.

Physical Education Skills (PES) 114: Exercise & Music

This class has been recommended as a fun (one credit hour) course for anyone to take. “You get to do new exercises each week and that makes it really fun.” There are students who help out and teach the course some weeks and that also adds some diversity to this class – you get something new each week!”Sweatin_to_the_oldies Richard Simons

Course Description:

Instruction and practice in various types of exercise programs. Students select from the activities listed in the current schedule of classes. Following is a partial list of activities: body conditioning; exercise and fitness; exercise to music; jogging and running; swimnastics; relaxation techniques; weight training; exercise and principles of weight control. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAS) 138: Thunderstorms & Tornadoes

An interesting course! This class provided one peer counselor the opportunity to learn about practical subjects. In this course, he learned to read weather maps and radars and “actually look at the different weather patterns” in ways that you don’t get to when you see the radar just on TV or online.

Course Description:

An elementary treatment of the physical structure of the atmosphere and the dynamical conditions that lead to the development of convective clouds, thunderstorms, and severe weather (including tornadoes, hail, wind, rain, lightning, and flash floods). This course will also focus on storm climatology, the socioeconomic impact of severe weather, as well as prediction, detection, warnings, and safety procedures. Analysis of severe weather events will include tornado movies and case studies of ground/aerial surveys of storm damage.

Still looking for some ideas? Check out our list of 6 more classes to fill your schedule!

class-schedule-fillers-at-purdue

Have you had a great class you’ve enjoyed at Purdue? Let us know below!

5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue

2 Jun

Recommended by Purdue students, compiled by Raysha Duncan, Purdue Alum
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

stack of books

Scheduling classes for the upcoming semester can be stressful whether you’re brand new to the process or if this is the millionth time (exaggerating just a little bit here) you’ve scheduled classes. And if you’re struggling to find one class to fill a scheduling space, that class can make all the difference and reduce class scheduling stress. We polled our peer counselors here at the Division of Financial Aid for suggestions on fun classes. Take a look below! Maybe you will find the class that completes your schedule and reduces your pre-semester stress.

Art and Design (AD) 255: Art Appreciation

One of our peer counselors took this class not only to fulfill a humanities requirement, but because she’s also “really interested in art fields.” It’s a great base for learning about art and while it has “zero to little homework, it’s really important to keep up” to get the most out of the class. The professor was clear and really easy to listen to, so she never felt unprepared. If you’re interested in art at all and need a humanities course, she HIGHLY recommends this course.

Course Objectives:

In this course, you will:

  • gain basic knowledge of art concerning media, vocabulary, themes, and history
  • patronize art establishments, such as galleries and museums (we’ll go as a class once or more)
  • describe and analyze works of art (current chances to see art will be announced in the classroom)
  • increase your aesthetic perception

English (ENGL) 227: Elements of Linguistics

This class is being recommended by an English major.  She just found this class “super interesting” because it pertained to her major and allowed her to learn a new field in the English realm.

William_Shakespeare_1609Subjects Covered:

  • Language: General Features
  • Phonetics/Phonology
  • Morphology
  • Syntax
  • Semantics
  • Pragmatics
  • Language and Languages

Art and Design (AD) 113: Basic Drawing

“A great, but tough class to take”, stated another Purdue Peer Counselor. There are some really great professors and the class provides you with an opportunity to learn some fundamental drawing skills. (It’s also a requirement if you want to move up in any 2-D art courses).

Course Objectives:

  • To develop and strengthen your observational , perceptual skills and creative
  • drawing skills
  • To challenge those skills by providing opportunities to explore a variety of media,
  • practices and concepts.
  • To sharpen your abilities to communicate visually and verbally when making and

analyzing art.

Physical Education Skills (PES) 114: Exercise & Music

This class has been recommended as a fun (one credit hour) course for anyone to take. “You get to do new exercises each week and that makes it really fun.” There are students who help out and teach the course some weeks and that also adds some diversity to this class – you get something new each week!”Sweatin_to_the_oldies Richard Simons

Course Description:

Instruction and practice in various types of exercise programs. Students select from the activities listed in the current schedule of classes. Following is a partial list of activities: body conditioning; exercise and fitness; exercise to music; jogging and running; swimnastics; relaxation techniques; weight training; exercise and principles of weight control. Typically offered Fall Spring.

Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAS) 138: Thunderstorms & Tornadoes

An interesting course! This class provided one peer counselor the opportunity to learn about practical subjects. In this course, he learned to read weather maps and radars and “actually look at the different weather patterns” in ways that you don’t get to when you see the radar just on TV or online.

Course Description:

An elementary treatment of the physical structure of the atmosphere and the dynamical conditions that lead to the development of convective clouds, thunderstorms, and severe weather (including tornadoes, hail, wind, rain, lightning, and flash floods). This course will also focus on storm climatology, the socioeconomic impact of severe weather, as well as prediction, detection, warnings, and safety procedures. Analysis of severe weather events will include tornado movies and case studies of ground/aerial surveys of storm damage.

Still looking for some ideas? Check out our list of 6 more classes to fill your schedule!

class-schedule-fillers-at-purdue

Have you had a great class you’ve enjoyed at Purdue? Let us know below!

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