Tag Archives: Job Searching

Industrial Roundtable This Week!

11 Sep

The annual Industrial Roundtable is happening this week! The Industrial Roundtable is a two-day job fair that attracts around 400 companies and over 10,000 Purdue students, making it one of the largest student-run job fairs in the country.

This is the perfect opportunity to meet face-to-face with companies looking to hire students like you for internships, co-ops, and even full-time positions!

Whether you are a graduating senior or a new freshman, this is for everyone to find opportunities. Even for those who are not involved in Engineering the companies present often are hiring for other positions as well.

With a little preparation and information, you can be on the way to finding the perfect opportunity to gain a crucial internship or even set yourself up with a job for after college.

Company Seminars

If you have any companies that you are specifically interested in, be sure to make time for their company seminar in the Stewart Center. These are happening TODAY and are a great time to learn more about specific opportunities, company culture, and ask questions in a 50-minute session.

Believe it or not, there are 116 different company sessions today in the Stewart Center with start times ranging from 1:30 p.m. through 7:30 p.m.

So stop by, learn from and network with representatives from a potential employer!

Preparing for the Industrial Roundtable

This isn’t some high school job fair, this is the real deal. There isn’t much time before it starts tomorrow, so here is a list of what you need to do:

  1. Reach out to your professors that have courses during the time you plan on attending the Roundtables. They may not permit you to miss class for this and, if so, you’ll need to adjust your plans for how many employers you wish to meet with.
  2. Do your homework on the companies. Yes, these companies are coming to us, but these are major companies that potential employees flock to. It’s a little bit of a treat and a huge compliment that they are coming to Purdue University.
    So return the favor. Look them up, check out their website and see any related news to them. See what they are doing, what their motto is, what breaking discoveries or products they have come out with, are they particularly proud of something, etc.
    Make sure you go into the Industrial Roundtable knowing the company and their representatives. Someone who is excited about what the company is doing will stand out over someone just looking for a job. The Industrial Roundtable website has a list of all the employers coming.
  3. Prep your résumé and bring multiple copies of it with you. Recruiters will be seeing dozens, or even hundreds, of students during the day so give them something to remember you by.
    Now is the time to stand out and make a statement. Our campus has the Center for Career Opportunities (CCO) with trained employees who are more than happy to help you with your résumé in order to stand out from the crowd.
    They can also help you with two other often forgotten aspects: a cover letter, and a follow up letter. It’s up to your discretion if you would need a cover letter, but you should always do a follow-up letter.
  4. Prepare your two minute speech. You likely have two minutes (or less) to make a lasting impression of yourself. And you need to sell yourself. Now is not the time to be humble.
    If you got it, own it and flaunt it.
    Make sure to check both the CCO website and the Industrial Roundtable website as often times, they list tips on which questions you should be prepared to answer.
  5. Dress to impress. This is the real deal and it’s business professional. Be prepared for suits and blazers. If at all possible, don’t take your back pack as it can ruin the look and can make an awkward two-minute speech.
    Recruiters are looking for professionals, so make it easy to see you as one. Many employers won’t even consider someone who can’t look the part. Also, a good outfit is just one more way to stand out.
  6. Make a schedule. Industrial Roundtable tends to have loads of recruiters, representing tons of companies, and typically a pretty sizeable amount of the student population will also attend. It would be impossible to meet with every company and don’t forget you also have classes that you may not be able to/should not skip. So make a list of top ten companies that your experience and background will most likely align with. Be sure to not pick all huge companies or all really popular ones as these will be the busiest and you may only get to two. Be prepared to stand in lines as well.
  7. Make a schedule. Industrial Roundtable tends to have loads of recruiters, representing tons of companies, and typically a pretty sizable amount of the student population will also attend.
    It would be impossible to meet with every company, and don’t forget you also have classes that you may not be able to/should not skip. So make a list of top ten companies that your experience and background will most likely align with.
    Be sure to not pick all huge companies or all really popular ones as these will be the busiest and you may only get to two. Be prepared to stand in lines as well.
  8. Get contact and follow-up info! Remember that these recruiters see tons of people in one day. Having their name and contact info can help you take the initiative. A nice hint is that after you walk away with your card, write what you talked about on it so in your follow-up email or thank-you letter you can reference the conversation and bring you back into their mind more clearly.
  9. Be prepared if any future offers come your way! Think of what your priorities are when it comes to jobs. Is the salary your main concern? What about location, benefits packages, or company size? Knowing what’s important to you helps make the decision much easier.

The biggest thing you should take away from this is that you need to prep and get ready. This is a tremendous opportunity that you don’t want to miss.

Even if you don’t feel like you would get a position, go anyway! You never know what might happen.

Practice your communication skills, networking, and preparing your résumé. Just make sure you get ready for it because the companies will be ready for you.

Remember that each interview is a completely fresh start. If you stumbled on words last time, the next one is your opportunity to give the perfect delivery.

Looking for a School Year Job?

3 Aug

www.purdue.edu/mymoney

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus.

I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the latest trends and enjoy a cup of Starbucks every few days? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans?

Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention. Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus.  If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Be sure to follow @Hire_A_Boiler on Twitter for daily tweets about job openings that were posted that day and other job searching tips!

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that hire students.

Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains. There are enough employers hiring at any given time, that if you want a job you should be able to find one!

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online BE CAREFUL!  Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam.

You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through the Better Business Bureau. A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring, or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring.

If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search!

Be sure to leave any job openings nearby or job searching tips in the comments! 

Looking for a Part-Time Job During the School Year?

13 Jun

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus. I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the random expenses that pop up, let alone some money for fun? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans?

Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention. Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! Employers often start lining up their new hires for the fall around late June, so the time to apply is approaching quickly. This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus. If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Start here for specific student employment options. Purdue University’s Student Employment website is a comprehensive job posting website with on and off campus opportunities. This site is especially helpful if you need to search specifically for a work-study position.

Are you looking for other employment opportunities on campus? Check out the different employment websites listed below.

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that prefer to hire students. Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains.

Remember, you can use the city bus service for free as a Purdue student! Even if a job isn’t within walking distance, it may be on a convenient bus route.

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online be careful! Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam. You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through BBB.

A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring.

If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search! Feel free to post any openings you know of in the comments.

Thinking Summer?

6 Apr

ThinkingSummer Blog.jpg
April is upon us and that means summer is closer than you think. Even with a bunch of projects and finals between now and then, it’s a perfect time to start preparing for the summer!

If your plans were to kick your feet back and finally get some time to relax, that’s great… Except you’re probably going to be incredibly bored after a week of nothing. So, here’s a handful of ideas on how to spend your summer:

Take Classes

Using your summer to take courses isn’t exactly the coolest sounding thing to do, but being able to graduate a semester or two earlier gets you that much closer to making real money. Worried about the bill for summer classes? You are able to use financial aid to cover it!

Be sure to fill out the Summer Aid Application on your myPurdue account. Without the summer aid application, the Financial Aid office won’t create an aid package for you even if you’re enrolled in classes. You can fill the application out whether you are taking classes on-campus, online, or for study abroad!THINKSUMMERLOGO

In addition to the Financial Aid office’s aid, if this will be your first time taking summer courses or you are a going to be able to graduate in August, you should check out the ThinkSummer website for the Summer Stay and Summer Finish scholarship applications.

Get a Job

Another classic summer option that might make your parents proud: get a job! Due to the large-scale migration out of West Lafayette in the summer there are plenty of job openings both on and around campus. Check out either the Financial Aid or Student Employment job boards to see what’s open and apply ahead of time.

The summer is prime time to find a job that can net you full days of hours which in turn can make a nice paycheck. If you spend the money you earn wisely, you can set yourself up with a nice savings safety net, reduce your student debt, or even have a little fun with a big purchase you haven’t had the funds for.

Get outdoors

Besides working and class, don’t forget to have some fun! Summer represents the prime months to enjoy the outdoors around West Lafayette. Whether you’re looking to get out and hike in the parks, visit the Wolf Park, or local Prophetstown State Park there’s plenty to do. So pause Netflix for an afternoon and do something you wish you could’ve been doing during the winter!

PSA: The State Street Project

Remember that State Street is going to be worked on continuously throughout the summer. As it’s the main route cutting through campus, you’re probably best off if you can find ways to avoid it entirely. If not, just check out http://statestreetwl.com/ to see what sections are currently open and what the current traffic conditions are.

 

Job Searching: Which Jobs to Apply For?

5 Apr

Searching for your first job out of college can be a daunting task. While it may seem like graduation is forever away, it’s actually right around the corner. Not only do you have to learn how to apply for your first real job, you have to figure out which jobs you even want to apply for. Between tweaking your resume and creating cover letters, you’ll quickly realize you can’t apply for every opening. With your limited time, you have to choose which jobs to apply for and what jobs end up being passed over. So here are five tips on figuring out which jobs you should be applying for.first job search post college advice.jpg

#1. Pick your priority

Figure out what your priority is when job searching. Many people won’t even consider job searching outside of the area in which they live, while others are looking for an escape. There are a lot of factors that go into figuring out which job you’ll want, and if you know what your #1 priority is, deciding whether or not to apply for a job makes it that much easier. Here are some different factors to help you find your priority:

  • Location – Many people are tied to one area due to family or their significant others. To them, relocating isn’t an option. Others would like nothing more than a change of scenery; therefore, relocating isn’t a problem.
  • Pay/ Salary – We all need money, but for some people the desire for high pay trumps all other potential priorities.
  • Opportunity for Advancement – Especially if it’s your first job, potential advancement opportunities can make a big difference, as you don’t have to switch employers for upward mobility.
  • Specific Job Field – This may seem like a given for your search, but if you found a job outside of your field that meet all your other requirements, would the field matter?
  • Benefits Package – Typically not the #1 priority, but flexibility, vacation time, healthcare, dental, daycare, or even student loan repayment vary greatly from one employer to the next.
  • Making a Difference – Not all jobs pay well monetarily, but instead rely more on the feeling of making a positive difference in the world.
  • Employer Size – Working at a major company has a lot of exciting benefits to some people. Or maybe you’d feel more comfortable in a smaller, more intimate type of setting?
  • Job Security – Getting that first job is no good if you are laid off right away. If this is your priority, you may be willing to compromise for a job with decent security.

#2 Remember, it’s your first job, not your dream job

If your first job happens to end up being your dream job, congratulations! For the rest of us who make an average of seven career changes in our working lives, the key to a successful first job is using it as a launching pad. Look for jobs that have advancement opportunities or marketable skills to help you propel yourself throughout your career.

You don’t want to end up in a job you hate, but it’s important to remember that this job can be a valuable experience to help land you your dream job down the road. This is especially true if you are leaving college without a lot of experience in your field.

Keep in mind that the salary will be entry-level, as well. Don’t be surprised if you’re not offered the median salary in your industry since you don’t have much, if any, field experience. If you do well, you can earn your advancement in pay or position by moving up within the company or with another employer.

#3 Know yourself

Before you accept a job, be sure that it’s a job you want and not one that parents, counselors, or friends want for you. Hopefully you have had enough life experience to know not only what your priorities are, but what equates to a deal-breaker for you. Does a typical 9-5 sound ideal or does working varied hours sound more appealing? Do you prefer to travel for work or would you prefer to be in the same location every day? Be sure it’s what you actually want or you could be back to job searching again before you know it. This job needs to fit your current lifestyle, not only the “what-if” scenarios you’ve considered for your future.

#4 It takes time (and it might be your job for a while)

Unemployment is not much fun after the first couple weeks, as concerns about being able to pay your bills—and eventually student loans—become reality. It takes time to fill out applications and tweak your resume for each job. Remember that until you find your full-time job, your job is to job search. It is exhausting applying for various jobs for eight hours a day, but it’s better than not being able to make your ends meet.

#5 Utilize your network

If you’re still in school, you’re going to want to take advantage of all those free lunches and other events put on to meet your professors and other staff. Not only do these people have connections outside of your college, they can also be great resources for the future. Talk to them and find out how they got their foot in the door! Don’t be shy about asking for an informational interview from these people. Many have a vested interest in seeing you succeed and will go out of their way to help you. Just be sure to make a good impression while you still can!

Financial Aid February: Answering your Work Study Questions

23 Feb

Work study is a unique form of financial aid that doesn’t act like other the other types of aid that might see on your Financial Aid Award Notice. Questions about work study are one of the most common ones that students contact the Financial Aid office about, so we took some of the most common work study questions and provided answers right here!

financial-aid-february-work-study

So what is work study?

Federal Work Study is a federally funded form of self-help aid that allows students to earn money for school by working part-time jobs.

How is work study different than other aid?

While your grants, scholarships, and loans will credit your account balance and pay your bill, work study will not. You have to earn your work study funds during the school year by working in a job that can utilize your work study funds (on-campus & off-campus non profits typically). It is paid to you via bi-weekly paychecks similar to most other jobs.

What are the advantages of work study?

Having work study provides some notable positives for students who utilize it. The biggest is that it opens up a large pool of employers who would not otherwise be able to hire you. These are mostly on-campus departments who typically have the most flexible hours and are near where students live. The other positive is that the funds you earn through work study do not count as income when you file your FAFSA, which can help keep your expected family contribution (EFC) low.

How do I use my work study?

You will need to find a job that can utilize work study. These can either be on-campus or off-campus at non-profits that have work study agreements with Purdue. You then need to provide your employer with a Payroll Authorization Form (PAF). You can print one from your myPurdue portal, but only one. If you have more than one work study job or need another one for some reason you’ll need to stop by the Financial Aid office in Schleman Hall to have another printed for you.

How do I find work study jobs?

Both the Division of Financial Aid and Student Life host job posting boards for Purdue students. You can use these boards to find jobs on and around campus. Keep in mind that not all off-campus employers can use your work study funds. You can still work off-campus, but the money you earn won’t be from your work study fund.

Can anybody get work study?

No, Federal Work Study is for students who demonstrate a high level of financial need as determined by the results from the FAFSA. If you did not receive work study and would like it, you can contact the Division of Financial Aid and ask to be put on a wait list.

How do I receive my work study funds?

Even though work study is a form of financial aid, you have to earn it by working. After finding a job and working there, you will be paid bi-weekly depending on how many hours you work and what your wage is.

Do all work study jobs pay the same?

No, the hourly wage can be very different from one job to the next depending on the level of skill required and many other factors. It is worth searching available jobs to find one that pays well while also being a good fit in terms of duties, flexibility and location.

Do I need work study to find a job?

No, but work study makes it much easier to find a job around campus. Many academic departments and off-campus employers will only hire work study eligible students. Having work study opens up a pool of employers who might not be available otherwise.

What if I don’t plan on working right away?

You should still accept your work study if you think you might want it. Students who do not accept their work study risk having it cancelled so that it can be distributed to students who requested to be on the work study wait list.

Can I use work study to pay my tuition?

Sort of. Your tuition bill for the semester is due on the first day of class, you cannot start utilizing your work study funds until the semester starts. This means you won’t get paid until after the tuition bill is due. Work study is typically a good way to give students money for pay as you go expenses like rent, food, or other miscellaneous costs but it isn’t great at paying tuition. The best way to apply your work study earnings toward tuition is if you save it in your own account and use it to pay the next semester’s tuition.

What if I run out of work study?

Depending on your situation, you may have a couple of options. You may be able to talk with your supervisor and see if your employer can pay you from their normal funds. If not, you can contact the Financial Aid office and see what options you might have including adjusting your budget.

Have questions that didn’t get answered? Be sure to comment and we’ll let you know the answer!

 

Need a Part-Time Job During the School Year?

16 Sep

www.purdue.edu/mymoney

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus. I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the latest trends and enjoy a cup of Starbucks every few days? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans. Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention.  Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus.  If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Start here for specific student employment options. Purdue University’s Student Employment website is a comprehensive job posting website with on and off campus opportunities.  This site is especially helpful if you need to search specifically for a work-study position.

Are you looking for other employment opportunities on campus?  Check out the different employment websites listed below.

Be sure to follow @Hire_A_Boiler on Twitter for daily tweets about job openings that were posted that day and other job searching tips!

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that hire students. Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains. There are enough employers hiring at any given time, that if you want a job you should be able to find one!

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online BE CAREFUL!  Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam.  You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through the Better Business Bureau. A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring, or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring. If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search!

Be sure to leave any job openings nearby or job searching tips in the comments! 

Which Jobs Should You Be Applying For?

15 Jul

Searching for your first job out of college can be a daunting task. While it may seem like graduation is forever away, it’s actually right around the corner. Not only do you have to learn how to apply for your first real job, you have to figure out which jobs you even want to apply for. Between tweaking your resume and creating cover letters, you’ll quickly realize you can’t apply for every opening. With your limited time, you have to choose which jobs to apply for and what jobs end up being passed over. So here are five tips on figuring out which jobs you should be applying for.first job search post college advice.jpg

#1. Pick your priority

Figure out what your priority is when job searching. Many people won’t even consider job searching outside of the area in which they live, while others are looking for an escape. There are a lot of factors that go into figuring out which job you’ll want, and if you know what your #1 priority is, deciding whether or not to apply for a job makes it that much easier. Here are some different factors to help you find your priority:

  • Location – Many people are tied to one area due to family or their significant others. To them, relocating isn’t an option. Others would like nothing more than a change of scenery; therefore, relocating isn’t a problem.
  • Pay/ Salary – We all need money, but for some people the desire for high pay trumps all other potential priorities.
  • Opportunity for Advancement – Especially if it’s your first job, potential advancement opportunities can make a big difference, as you don’t have to switch employers for upward mobility.
  • Specific Job Field – This may seem like a given for your search, but if you found a job outside of your field that meet all your other requirements, would the field matter?
  • Benefits Package – Typically not the #1 priority, but flexibility, vacation time, healthcare, dental, daycare, or even student loan repayment vary greatly from one employer to the next.
  • Making a Difference – Not all jobs pay well monetarily, but instead rely more on the feeling of making a positive difference in the world.
  • Employer Size – Working at a major company has a lot of exciting benefits to some people. Or maybe you’d feel more comfortable in a smaller, more intimate type of setting?
  • Job Security – Getting that first job is no good if you are laid off right away. If this is your priority, you may be willing to compromise for a job with decent security.

#2 Remember, it’s your first job, not your dream job

If your first job happens to end up being your dream job, congratulations! For the rest of us who make an average of seven career changes in our working lives, the key to a successful first job is using it as a launching pad. Look for jobs that have advancement opportunities or marketable skills to help you propel yourself throughout your career.

You don’t want to end up in a job you hate, but it’s important to remember that this job can be a valuable experience to help land you your dream job down the road. This is especially true if you are leaving college without a lot of experience in your field.

Keep in mind that the salary will be entry-level, as well. Don’t be surprised if you’re not offered the median salary in your industry since you don’t have much, if any, field experience. If you do well, you can earn your advancement in pay or position by moving up within the company or with another employer.

#3 Know yourself

Before you accept a job, be sure that it’s a job you want and not one that parents, counselors, or friends want for you. Hopefully you have had enough life experience to know not only what your priorities are, but what equates to a deal-breaker for you. Does a typical 9-5 sound ideal or does working varied hours sound more appealing? Do you prefer to travel for work or would you prefer to be in the same location every day? Be sure it’s what you actually want or you could be back to job searching again before you know it. This job needs to fit your current lifestyle, not only the “what-if” scenarios you’ve considered for your future.

#4 It takes time (and it might be your job for a while)

Unemployment is not much fun after the first couple weeks, as concerns about being able to pay your bills—and eventually student loans—become reality. It takes time to fill out applications and tweak your resume for each job. Remember that until you find your full-time job, your job is to job search. It is exhausting applying for various jobs for eight hours a day, but it’s better than not being able to make your ends meet.

#5 Utilize your network

If you’re still in school, you’re going to want to take advantage of all those free lunches and other events put on to meet your professors and other staff. Not only do these people have connections outside of your college, they can also be great resources for the future. Talk to them and find out how they got their foot in the door! Don’t be shy about asking for an informational interview from these people. Many have a vested interest in seeing you succeed and will go out of their way to help you. Just be sure to make a good impression while you still can!

College Seniors Week 1: Applying for Jobs

9 Apr

Raysha Duncan, Financial Aid Administrator & Purdue Alumna
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

Computer keyboard and mouse; text overlay: College Senior Job Search Tips

Graduation is only five weeks away guys, it’s crunch time. Many of us will be going off to join the work force; some already have jobs lined up, while another group will be continuing their educations in grad schools. Keep in mind, that it is important to be optimistic, but also realistic about the future. The job market is a scary place for graduating students, and with student loan payments looming on the horizon, you’ll need to keep your eyes and your mind open to new possibilities.

Where to Start

Purdue students and Purdue alumni are fortunate enough to have the Center for Career Opportunities (CCO) to help get their searches started. Even if you’re not at Purdue, here’s some good information for utilizing your college career center. Make an appropriate resume; you’re applying for a professional position, so you need to be professional. Potential employers first meet you on paper, so even though you may have a great personality in person; you need to show your skills on paper.

Finding Something You’re Interested In

Have you made it through your four years and haven’t pinpointed exactly what you want to do yet? Don’t know what field speaks to you the most? That’s okay! While you’re trying to figure out what you want to do, go out and network. All you have to do is talk: let people know who you are, what you like, and have an elevator pitch prepared. And if you’re under an extreme time crunch and just need to get a job to get the bills paid, continue exploring what you want to do after you’ve gotten the job you need right now. You may not find something in your field right away, but if you put in the time and effort, you will find the right job eventually.

Location

Be realistic about this one… Not everyone is able to pack up and move to New York City to pursue their dream job the day after graduation. You may have to move back in with your parents and work in your hometown until you find something in your field. But you should know where you want to go. If you want to make it to New York City, start your search for jobs exclusively there and find a group of roommates you can share a tiny apartment with somewhat-comfortably. If you want to stay closer to home and you’re from a smaller town, you may have a smaller pool for potential employers. If you’re open to moving anywhere, you’ve just opened your potential job opportunities exponentially because you’ll go wherever the job takes you (maybe to one of the ‘Best Cities for New College Grads in 2013’). Another possibility would be to look into online work/freelancing if you’re not sure where you want to move.

What job search tips do you have for our graduating seniors? Leave your suggestion in the comments!

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