Tag Archives: internship

Industrial Roundtable This Week!

11 Sep

The annual Industrial Roundtable is happening this week! The Industrial Roundtable is a two-day job fair that attracts around 400 companies and over 10,000 Purdue students, making it one of the largest student-run job fairs in the country.

This is the perfect opportunity to meet face-to-face with companies looking to hire students like you for internships, co-ops, and even full-time positions!

Whether you are a graduating senior or a new freshman, this is for everyone to find opportunities. Even for those who are not involved in Engineering the companies present often are hiring for other positions as well.

With a little preparation and information, you can be on the way to finding the perfect opportunity to gain a crucial internship or even set yourself up with a job for after college.

Company Seminars

If you have any companies that you are specifically interested in, be sure to make time for their company seminar in the Stewart Center. These are happening TODAY and are a great time to learn more about specific opportunities, company culture, and ask questions in a 50-minute session.

Believe it or not, there are 116 different company sessions today in the Stewart Center with start times ranging from 1:30 p.m. through 7:30 p.m.

So stop by, learn from and network with representatives from a potential employer!

Preparing for the Industrial Roundtable

This isn’t some high school job fair, this is the real deal. There isn’t much time before it starts tomorrow, so here is a list of what you need to do:

  1. Reach out to your professors that have courses during the time you plan on attending the Roundtables. They may not permit you to miss class for this and, if so, you’ll need to adjust your plans for how many employers you wish to meet with.
  2. Do your homework on the companies. Yes, these companies are coming to us, but these are major companies that potential employees flock to. It’s a little bit of a treat and a huge compliment that they are coming to Purdue University.
    So return the favor. Look them up, check out their website and see any related news to them. See what they are doing, what their motto is, what breaking discoveries or products they have come out with, are they particularly proud of something, etc.
    Make sure you go into the Industrial Roundtable knowing the company and their representatives. Someone who is excited about what the company is doing will stand out over someone just looking for a job. The Industrial Roundtable website has a list of all the employers coming.
  3. Prep your résumé and bring multiple copies of it with you. Recruiters will be seeing dozens, or even hundreds, of students during the day so give them something to remember you by.
    Now is the time to stand out and make a statement. Our campus has the Center for Career Opportunities (CCO) with trained employees who are more than happy to help you with your résumé in order to stand out from the crowd.
    They can also help you with two other often forgotten aspects: a cover letter, and a follow up letter. It’s up to your discretion if you would need a cover letter, but you should always do a follow-up letter.
  4. Prepare your two minute speech. You likely have two minutes (or less) to make a lasting impression of yourself. And you need to sell yourself. Now is not the time to be humble.
    If you got it, own it and flaunt it.
    Make sure to check both the CCO website and the Industrial Roundtable website as often times, they list tips on which questions you should be prepared to answer.
  5. Dress to impress. This is the real deal and it’s business professional. Be prepared for suits and blazers. If at all possible, don’t take your back pack as it can ruin the look and can make an awkward two-minute speech.
    Recruiters are looking for professionals, so make it easy to see you as one. Many employers won’t even consider someone who can’t look the part. Also, a good outfit is just one more way to stand out.
  6. Make a schedule. Industrial Roundtable tends to have loads of recruiters, representing tons of companies, and typically a pretty sizeable amount of the student population will also attend. It would be impossible to meet with every company and don’t forget you also have classes that you may not be able to/should not skip. So make a list of top ten companies that your experience and background will most likely align with. Be sure to not pick all huge companies or all really popular ones as these will be the busiest and you may only get to two. Be prepared to stand in lines as well.
  7. Make a schedule. Industrial Roundtable tends to have loads of recruiters, representing tons of companies, and typically a pretty sizable amount of the student population will also attend.
    It would be impossible to meet with every company, and don’t forget you also have classes that you may not be able to/should not skip. So make a list of top ten companies that your experience and background will most likely align with.
    Be sure to not pick all huge companies or all really popular ones as these will be the busiest and you may only get to two. Be prepared to stand in lines as well.
  8. Get contact and follow-up info! Remember that these recruiters see tons of people in one day. Having their name and contact info can help you take the initiative. A nice hint is that after you walk away with your card, write what you talked about on it so in your follow-up email or thank-you letter you can reference the conversation and bring you back into their mind more clearly.
  9. Be prepared if any future offers come your way! Think of what your priorities are when it comes to jobs. Is the salary your main concern? What about location, benefits packages, or company size? Knowing what’s important to you helps make the decision much easier.

The biggest thing you should take away from this is that you need to prep and get ready. This is a tremendous opportunity that you don’t want to miss.

Even if you don’t feel like you would get a position, go anyway! You never know what might happen.

Practice your communication skills, networking, and preparing your résumé. Just make sure you get ready for it because the companies will be ready for you.

Remember that each interview is a completely fresh start. If you stumbled on words last time, the next one is your opportunity to give the perfect delivery.

Smart Money Moves for your Internship Paycheck

7 Mar

Nathan Carmany, a Purdue Alumnus, is a Certified Financial Planner for Watermark Wealth Management

The spring semester is underway. Companies are recruiting and having conversations with
your professors about ideal candidates. You attend networking events, purchase new interview clothes, and hopefully land the perfect position for the summer. To stay ahead of your finances, you need to make a conscious plan for your earnings.internship txt crop.jpg

  1. PAY HIGH INTEREST RATE CREDIT CARDS 

The average balance for a college student in 2013 was $499. The average interest for student credit card interest is 13.42% stated as an APR, however, the effective rate after compounding daily is actually 14.34%. What better way to cut expenses than eliminating high interest obligations?

  1. CREATE A SPENDING PLAN

Consider creating a spending plan for the summer and school year to stretch the duration of the funds. Paul Arden stated, “Don’t look for the next opportunity. The one you have in hand is the opportunity.” Think about what opportunities you may put into your own hand with a well thought out spending plan.

  1. PAY FOR YOUR SUMMER CLASSES

Don’t overlook that your credits for the summer internship can cost money. Why not use some of the funds to possibly pay for those? Reduction of your total amount borrowed before interest is capitalized and recommended for faster loan payoff.

  1. PREFUND YOUR LIVING EXPENSES

Seniors, set aside as much as you can. When you find your first apartment or home, somewhere the move will create an unplanned expense. Inevitably it happens, an extra day rental on the moving truck, needing kitchen utensils, towels, or boxes. The money will help cushion for the unplanned expense. Do not forget about the extra cost of hooking up utilities, cable, or the internet.

  1. BUILD AN EMERGENCY FUNDgraph spending plan final.jpg

Traditional financial planning calls for 3-6 months of living expenses set aside for an emergency fund. Most people will experience at least one significant financial emergency in a three to five year period. It can be difficult for college students to save a full 6 months of living expenses, but setting aside a modest amount may prevent you from making a call to your parents when something comes up. Like my grandmother taught me, place the money in a zip lock bag and freeze it in a container of water, then see how easy it is to impulse spend!

  1. CONTRIBUTE TO A ROTH

The sooner retirement savings start; the less you have to save over the rest of your life. The compounding of gains and interest early on are difficult to make up if you delay contributing until later in life. By saving it in a Roth IRA, the earnings are tax free after age 59.5, as long a Roth account was opened 5 years ago or longer. That 5 year clock begins with the first contribution to your Roth. If you need access to the money, contributions are removed first without any penalty.

  1. PAY DOWN STUDENT LOANS

Hopefully, you have been informed about the inability for most borrowers to ever declare this type of debt in bankruptcy and that prolonged periods of missed payments will lead to wage garnishment, a much larger loan balance, and the destruction of your credit score. The grace period on most student loans expires 6 months after graduation. Interest is capitalized (meaning that it is added to the loan balance) at that point unless you qualify under a different exemption. Paying down unsubsidized loans (make sure your loan servicer allocate it properly) with your earnings before the end of the grace period is a great way to cut the overall cost of the loan.

Wrap Up

Think about your upcoming needs for the summer, school year, or beyond graduation. Pick one of the ideas to best suit your needs and work on an implementation plan. No matter which idea you execute, a well thought out plan will serve you well.

Industrial Roundtable Part 1

8 Sep

Hannah Stewart Purdue University Student and Peer Counselor
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

Industrial Roundtable Logo

Industrial Roundtable is coming soon to Purdue starting with seminars on September 15th, the Job Fair on the 16th and 17th, and ending with interviews September 18th through the 20th. This is a huge opportunity for students and employers come to campus looking to connect highly qualified students with internships, co-ops, and jobs. Industrial Roundtable is not just for graduating seniors; anyone can participate and benefit from the events held. And for those of us who aren’t engineers, I would recommend going anyway as sometimes there is an overlap, most companies have positions besides engineers. Every company needs HR, accounting, or management positions. It’s also a fabulous way to network. So, maybe they aren’t looking for your position now, but if you network, they could contact you when a position opens.

However, this isn’t your high school job fair, this is the real deal. As such, there is definitely some major prepping to do.

Stack of homework

Photo by: Loty

  1. Do your homework. Yes, these companies are coming to us. But these are major companies, some don’t even need to go looking for people, people flock to them. It’s a little bit of a treat and a huge compliment that they are coming to Purdue University. So return the favor. Look them up! See what they are doing, what their motto is, what breaking discoveries or products they have come out with, are they particularly proud of something, etc. Make sure you go into the Industrial Roundtable knowing the company and their representatives. Someone who is excited about what the company is doing will stand out over someone just looking for a job. The Industrial Roundtable website has a list of all the employers coming.
  2. Prep your résumé. Recruiters are not your best friends or family so they don’t know you that well. And they will be conversing with hundreds of other students, sometimes all within the same day. Now is the time to stand out and make a statement. Our campus has the Center for Career Opportunities (CCO), housed with trained employees, who are more than happy to help you with your résumé in order to stand out from the crowd. They can also help you with two other often forgotten aspects: a cover letter, and a follow up letter. It’s up to your discretion if you would need a cover letter, but you should always do a follow-up letter.
  3. Have letters of recommendation prepared because some employers will want them on the spot. Contact old employers, advisors, professors, anyone who can speak highly of you. The more professional the contact, the more it stands out. And double-check that they will write a good letter about you!
  4. Prepare your two minute speech. You have two minutes or less to make a lasting impression of yourself. And you need to sell yourself. Now is not the time to be humble, if you got it, own it and flaunt it. Make sure to check both the CCO website and the Industrial Roundtable website as often times, they list tips onwhichquestionsyoushould beprepared to answer.

    business professional examples

    Photo by: Kristian Bjornard

  5. Dress to impress. This is the real deal and its business professional. Be prepared for suits and blazers. If at possible, don’t take your back pack as it can ruin the look and can make an awkward two-minute speech. Recruiters are looking for professionals, so make it easy to see you as one. Many employers won’t even consider someone who can’t look the part. Also, a good outfit is just one more way to stand out.
  6. Make a schedule. Industrial Roundtable tends to have loads of recruiters, representing tons of companies, and typically a pretty sizeable amount of the student population will also attend. It would be impossible to meet with every company and don’t forget you also have classes that you may not be able to/should not skip. So make a list of top ten companies that your experience and background will most likely align with. Be sure to not pick all huge companies or all really popular ones as these will be the busiest and you may only get to two. Be prepared to stand in lines as well.

The biggest thing you should take away from this is that you need to prep and get ready. This is a tremendous opportunity that you don’t want to miss. Even if you don’t feel like you would get a position, go anyways! Practice your communication skills, networking, and preparing your résumé. Just make sure you get ready for it because the companies will be ready for you.

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