Tag Archives: financial need

The Impact of the Potential Cut to Subsidized Student Loans

24 May

Casey Doten, Financial Aid Administrator – Purdue University

The newest federal budget proposal has proposed reductions to several federal student aid programs including cuts to Pell Grants, Work Study, and ending the Perkins loan program, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Public Service Loan Forgiveness, and subsidized federal loans to students. This budget proposal in its current state would have a direct financial impact upon any student with financial need, not just those in the lowest income brackets.
Cuts to Sub Loan.jpg

Ending subsidized federal loans would likely have the widest impact of the proposed cuts as there are currently over 29 million borrowers of these loans.

Subsidized loans are one of the most common forms of financial aid available to students who demonstrate financial need. They differ from unsubsidized federal loans because interest does not accrue on them while the student is still in school. If a student takes out a $3,500 subsidized loan their freshman year, it will still be $3,500 when they leave school while an unsubsidized loan would have accrued an extra $612 of interest in that time.

The difference becomes more stark when you compare subsidized versus unsubsidized over four years. A student taking out the maximum in federal loans each year for four years would borrow $27,000, of which $19,000 is subsidized. That student would have $27,785 of debt when leaving college versus a student who only had unsubsidized loan (which is what the budget proposal would lead to) would owe $29,353 when entering their grace period on the exact same amount borrowed, with the exact same interest rate.

Once a student begins repayment, all of that accrued interest gets added on to their loan balance and further gathers interest. For a student using the most aggressive payment plan, they will pay $2,081 more over the life of the loan because their loans were not subsidized.

Keep in mind these figures use interest rates from the past several years. Since student loan interest rates are keyed off treasury bonds rates, if the economy were to increase at the rate projected in the budget then student loan interest rates raise even higher as treasury bonds interest increases. This would further exacerbate the difference between subsidized and unsubsidized loans.

While graduating in four years is considered the norm, only 36% of students pursuing bachelor’s degrees do so. If a student takes even one more year to get their degree, the time for their interest to accrue becomes even greater. Loans for these students who can receive subsidized loans totals $32,341 on graduation, while unsubsidized-only adds up to $35,305. These two groups have a $3,513 difference in the life of the loan.

All told, subsidized loans would collectively save the 29.5 million current borrowers $45.5 billion assuming they all graduated in four years. That number only grows higher when realizing that many students take more than four years to graduate.

Financial Aid February: Understanding your Award Notice

9 Feb

If you — as a newly accepted student — applied for financial aid and submitted all verification information that was requested you should expect to receive an award notice from Purdue Division of Financial Aid (DFA) in late February.

This will be sent to your Purdue.edu email address, which you gain access to by activating your career account. The email notification directs students to view their financial aid offer online in their myPurdue system under the Financial tab. Notifications will also be sent to parents who supplied a parent email address on the FAFSA.

First-time students at Purdue will receive an award letter through postal mail. Families can review the recorded Paying for Purdue Award Notice Webinar online as an additional resource.

Award letter example

While the first place that your eyes will look is undoubtedly the Free Money section, a better place to start is by looking at the estimated Cost of Attendance (COA) on the right side. The COA is not your bill! Rather, it is an estimate of the costs of being a full-time student and living in West Lafayette for the school year. It also shows the maximum amount of aid you are allowed to receive for the year, not what you ought to be taking. Your actual bill will come later once you’ve signed up for courses. The only costs you will owe Purdue directly are for tuition/ fees, a meal plan (if you have one), and housing costs if you live on campus.

Now that you know that maximum amount of aid you can receive, the free money awaits. If you have any grants or scholarships, they will appear here. If you have an outside scholarship and have not reported it yet , you can do that via your myPurdue. Grants and scholarships are the ideal form of aid since you do not have to pay them back!

If you subtract your gift aid from the Cost of Attendance, you are left with your remaining “Net Cost”. You can look to cover this amount with the “self-help aid”, using money you already have, or a combination of the two. This is the amount you must cover with money you either have now or in the future.

The self-help aid section is where your offered loans and work study will show up. While these options aren’t as preferable as free money they are a better option for many than trying to pay out of pocket.Fin Aid Feb Award Notice.jpg

It’s important to know that while work study is a form of financial aid, it does not credit your account like the other forms of aid do! Having work study opens up many employers on and around campus who will only hire work study students. The student still needs to find a job and earn the money which is paid via a bi-weekly paycheck. If you don’t work enough hours to receive your entire work study amount, you don’t receive it. Work study is a good way to be able to supply yourself with spending money throughout the year, but it is not a reliable way to pay your Purdue bill since you receive it after the bill is already due.

The other type of self-help aid is the loan. Every loan is slightly different, both in interest and in the steps you need to take to receive it. Federal loans typically are preferable to private loans and often offer more flexible repayment options as well.

As you review the award notice and look up different Financial Aid Terms, keep in mind that grants and scholarships are types of gift aid that do not need to be repaid. Loans and work-study are types of self-help financial aid that must be repaid either in money or labor.fin_need.png

One question that often comes up is where the FAFSA fits into all of this? The FAFSA’s primary job is to create the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number, which reflects a family’s anticipated financial strength. The formula for financial need is made by subtracting the EFC from the Cost of Attendance. The remaining amount is the maximum amount of need-based aid a student is eligible for. This can be scholarships/ grants with a need requirement, subsidized loans, or Federal Work Study. It is not guaranteed that your financial need will be filled with need-based aid.

Remember that even if you don’t think you will be eligible for need-based aid, you should still file the FAFSA as some scholarships have it as one of their requirements!

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