Tag Archives: class

6 Classes to Fill Your Schedule at Purdue

23 Mar

class schedule fillers at purdue.jpg
It’s that time of the year! Making your schedule for next semester and not sure what you should take for those last few credits to get you to full-time? Since our first article for 5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue is one of our most popular blogs, we figured it’s time to offer up a few more student suggested courses for those making their schedule for next semester.

Quick information: full-time can mean a lot of different things for undergraduates. For financial aid, full-time is 12 credits in order to have a full award. For academic purposes, the Registrar also goes off a 12-credit rule for full-time. These two are the same for both fall/spring and summer.  However, for billing purposes flat-rate/ full-time billing begins at 8 credits. So whether you take 8 or 18 credits, your base tuition price is the same (unless you have course fees). Graduate student full-time changes fall/spring versus summer, so this information doesn’t apply to them.

Whether you’re looking for something to fill elective credits, general education requirements or just figure you’ll toss another class in to broaden your horizons, there are tons of course options at Purdue. Here is a sampling that other students have suggested:11082590_10153256154614271_7166009571184015507_n.png

PES 115 (Bowling): You may think Physical Education courses were left in the dust in high school, but the 1-credit PES 115 comes as one of the more highly recommended courses from students. The grading doesn’t go off your actual bowling scores, but rather off your attendance and performance on assignments and quizzes. Extra bonus? You can have Pappy’s delivered to your lane since it’s in the Union.

ENG 232 (J.R.R. Tolkien): Feel like you don’t have time for any fun reading during the semester? Well, this class can combine for-class reading assignments with your favorites! Explore Middle Earth by the books during the week and maybe spend your weekends studying up by watching the trilogies.

HIST 371  (Society, Culture and Rock & Roll/ History of Rock & Roll): Not only is the subject matter exciting, but the real sticking point for this class is that the instructor has incredible passion about the subject and makes it fun for the students. The course usually fills up quickly so if you’re thinking about this one, you’ll want to jump on it!

HORT 360 (Interior Flower Arrangement): While arranging flowers might sounds like it could be sneaky difficult, it comes highly recommended by those who have taken it. Remembering a few facts from high school biology will come in handy, but prior knowledge is not needed. In addition, you end up with an apartment full of fresh flowers and house plants at the end of the course. Note this class has an extra fee so it will cost you extra!

COM 212 (Approaches to the Study of Interpersonal Communication): A communication course that can be taken online may sound strange but it is reality. While it might not sound up your alley, this course doubles as both being enjoyable and being one of the more useful courses post-graduation. For better or worse, being able to communicate well in front of other people is a big part of life after college.

CSR 105 (Personal Finance): One of the courses many people often think should be mandatory in high school due to its importance in everyday life. CSR 105 teaches you about how credit works, paying back student loans, and tax information. It might be the most useful course you take in college for your financial future.

While the courses listed have all been endorsed by current and past students, it’s always worth doing some checking on your end as well. Sometimes instructors or the course material changes can make a big difference. You should also take some time to check out how your potential instructor rates on Rate My Professor and see what comments are left there from other students. While individual reviews aren’t always a fair summary of an instructor, seeing several along the same lines can give you a good idea of what to prepare for.

Have a class you’ve taken that was memorable in a good way? Help spread the word in the comments!

6 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue

17 Mar

class schedule fillers at purdue.jpg
Making your schedule for next semester and not sure what you should take for those last few credits to get you to full-time? Since our first article for 5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue is one of our most popular blogs, we figured it’s time to offer up a few more student suggested courses for those making their schedule for next semester.

Quick information: full-time can mean a lot of different things for undergraduates. For financial aid, full-time is 12 credits in order to have a full award. For academic purposes, the Registrar also goes off a 12-credit rule for full-time. These two are the same for both fall/spring and summer.  However, for billing purposes flat-rate/ full-time billing begins at 8 credits. So whether you take 8 or 18 credits, your base tuition price is the same (unless you have course fees). Graduate student full-time changes fall/spring versus summer, so this information doesn’t apply to them.

Whether you’re looking for something to fill elective credits, general education requirements or just figure you’ll toss another class in to broaden your horizons, there are tons of course options at Purdue. Here is a sampling that other students have suggested:11082590_10153256154614271_7166009571184015507_n.png

PES 115 (Bowling): You may think Physical Education courses were left in the dust in high school, but the 1-credit PES 115 comes as one of the more highly recommended courses from students. The grading doesn’t go off your actual bowling scores, but rather off your attendance and performance on assignments and quizzes. Extra bonus? You can have Pappy’s delivered to your lane since it’s in the Union.

ENG 232 (J.R.R. Tolkien): Feel like you don’t have time for any fun reading during the semester? Well, this class can combine for-class reading with your favorites! Explore Middle Earth by the books during the week and maybe spend your weekends studying up by watching the trilogies.

HIST 371  (Society, Culture and Rock & Roll/ History of Rock & Roll): Not only is the subject matter exciting, but the real sticking point for this class is that the instructor has incredible passion about the subject and makes it fun for the students. The course usually fills up quickly so if you’re thinking about this one, you’ll want to jump on it!

HORT 360 (Interior Flower Arrangement): While arranging flowers might sounds like it could be sneaky difficult, it comes highly recommended by those who have taken it. Remembering a few facts from high school biology will come in handy, but prior knowledge is not needed. In addition, you end up with an apartment full of fresh flowers and house plants at the end of the course. Note this class has an extra fee so it will cost you extra!

COM 212 (Approaches to the Study of Interpersonal Communication): A communication course that can be taken online may sound strange but it is reality. While it might not sound up your alley, this course doubles as both being enjoyable and being one of the more useful courses post-graduation. For better or worse, being able to communicate well in front of other people is a big part of life after college. graph spending plan final crop.jpg

CSR 105 (Personal Finance): One of the courses many people often think should be mandatory in high school due to its importance in everyday life. CSR 105 teaches you about how credit works, paying back student loans, and tax information. It might be the most useful course you take in college for your financial future.

While the courses listed have all been endorsed by current and past students, it’s always worth doing some checking on your end as well. Sometimes instructors or the course material changes can make a big difference. You should also take some time to check out how your potential instructor rates on Rate My Professor and see what comments are left there from other students. While individual reviews aren’t always a fair summary of an instructor, seeing several along the same lines can give you a good idea of what to prepare for.

Have a class you’ve taken that was memorable in a good way? Help spread the word in the comments!

6 Classes to Fill Your Schedule at Purdue

28 Oct

class schedule fillers at purdue.jpg
Making your schedule for next semester and not sure what you should take for those last few credits to get you to full-time? Since our first article for 5 Class Schedule Fillers at Purdue is one of our most popular blogs, we figured it’s time to offer up a few more student suggested courses for those making their schedule for next semester.

Quick information: full-time can mean a lot of different things for undergraduates. For financial aid, full-time is 12 credits in order to have a full award. For academic purposes, the Registrar also goes off a 12-credit rule for full-time. These two are the same for both fall/spring and summer.  However, for billing purposes flat-rate/ full-time billing begins at 8 credits. So whether you take 8 or 18 credits, your base tuition price is the same (unless you have course fees). Graduate student full-time changes fall/spring versus summer, so this information doesn’t apply to them.

Whether you’re looking for something to fill elective credits, general education requirements or just figure you’ll toss another class in to broaden your horizons, there are tons of course options at Purdue. Here is a sampling that other students have suggested:11082590_10153256154614271_7166009571184015507_n.png

PES 115 (Bowling): You may think Physical Education courses were left in the dust in high school, but the 1-credit PES 115 comes as one of the more highly recommended courses from students. The grading doesn’t go off your actual bowling scores, but rather off your attendance and performance on assignments and quizzes. Extra bonus? You can have Pappy’s delivered to your lane since it’s in the Union.

ENG 232 (J.R.R. Tolkien): Feel like you don’t have time for any fun reading during the semester? Well, this class can combine for-class reading with your favorites! Explore Middle Earth by the books during the week and maybe spend your weekends studying up by watching the trilogies.

HIST 371  (Society, Culture and Rock & Roll/ History of Rock & Roll): Not only is the subject matter exciting, but the real sticking point for this class is that the instructor has incredible passion about the subject and makes it fun for the students. The course usually fills up quickly so if you’re thinking about this one, you’ll want to jump on it!

HORT 360 (Interior Flower Arrangement): While arranging flowers might sounds like it could be sneaky difficult, it comes highly recommended by those who have taken it. Remembering a few facts from high school biology will come in handy, but prior knowledge is not needed. In addition, you end up with an apartment full of fresh flowers and house plants at the end of the course. *Note* this class has an extra fee so it will cost you extra!

COM 212 (Approaches to the Study of Interpersonal Communication): A communication course that can be taken online may sound strange but it is reality. While it might not sound up your alley, this course doubles as both being enjoyable and being one of the more useful courses post-graduation. For better or worse, being able to communicate well in front of other people is a big part of life after college. graph spending plan final crop.jpg

CSR 105 (Personal Finance): One of the courses many people often think should be mandatory in high school due to its importance in everyday life. CSR 105 teaches you about how credit works, paying back student loans, and tax information. It might be the most useful course you take in college for your financial future.

While the courses listed have all been endorsed by current and past students, it’s always worth doing some checking on your end as well. Sometimes instructors or the course material changes can make a big difference. You should also take some time to check out how your potential instructor rates on Rate My Professor and see what comments are left there from other students. While individual reviews aren’t always a fair summary of an instructor, seeing several along the same lines can give you a good idea of what to prepare for.

Have a class you’ve taken that was memorable in a good way? Help spread the word in the comments!

 

A Procrastinator’s Guide to Making Your College Class Schedule

14 Oct

When you think of that person in college who is always on top of everything, has their classes for next year already figured out and knows every stop from now to graduation then you’ve basically described the opposite person of me. Organization and planning never came easy for me, not that I ever really cared much about it. However, as life got crazy busy for me in my last couple years of school I found that I needed some ways to keep my life together as I was figuring out the next semester’s classes come registration time. Here are some tips that can help fellow procrastinators plan their semesters.calendar-schedule-procrastination

Start off by checking out your degree plan (your myPurdue Plan) and what requirements you need to stay on track toward graduation. While there’s seemingly a million things early on, you tend to see the light after a couple years and the classes that you need to take later become fewer. Pro Tip: leave a few generals classes for your last year – they typically have multiple sections and are easy to schedule around that senior seminar class that is only offered once per year. Once you know what requirements you need to check off and what classes you might be interested to do so, it’s time to meet with your advisor.

Before you sign up for classes, most colleges force you to meet with your academic advisor. Even if they don’t, it’s something you should try to do. However, that’s not to say that it should be the first part of planning your next semester. Your advisor is much more effective if you come prepared! Having the previously mentioned wish list of classes and what objectives you have left using your myPurdue Plan worksheet will make your meeting much more productive and give you time for those other questions your advisor can help with, like internships and post-grad plans.

So now you know what classes you should be taking and have your other questions answered it’s time for actually signing up. The key here is knowing your life. Not everyone is cut out for 8 a.m. classes. If you’re going to skip for sleep rather than go, find a way to work around it rather than handicapping yourself. Try to spread out your difficult classes, both across semesters and across days of the week.

Also take into account your life outside of class. If you have to work, have an idea of what your schedule might look like. One of the positives of having an on-campus job is that they tend to be able to fit hours in around your schedule rather than trying to get you to do the opposite.

Plan on taking 15 credits every semester! If you take 12 one semester, you have to make it up somewhere down the line and that sets you up for a potential 18 credit nightmare. This will keep you on track to graduate in 4 years. Not staying on track for 4 year graduation has a whole host of potential issues that come up including the costs of extra tuition & lost wages from not working, losing state financial aid, and running out of federal financial aid  and 4-year scholarships.

Once you’ve taken care of the scheduling aspect, everything else starts to fall into place. You know your class times, you can figure out what time you’re busy with student organizations, you can fit in your work schedule and then everything else is left over for leisure, study, and class work time. Classes typically only take up less than 20 hours per week of actual in-class time. If you add that plus a mythical 12 hours of sleep per night, and 12 hours of work each day, you still have 52 hours of free time to devote to everything else (including homework) in a week. The key is finding a stable pattern that can help you take care of what you need. For us disorganized and unscheduled people knowing that you absolutely cannot procrastinate a project until tomorrow because your only actual time to work on it is today can make a world of a difference. If you have a relatively consistent schedule you can know this rather than being overwhelmed the next day because that paper is due tomorrow but you’re supposed to be at a club meeting tonight!

Other random tips:

Use ratemyprofessors.com to get an idea of what instructors are best.

Seriously, use a planner or calendar or something to put down when papers are due, when tests are, and other big events that could get in the way. I had at least half the crisis moments when I could actually see when I would have busy times coming.

Figure out your study style. Some people need to read and highlight, some people need to write and rewrite notes, and some learn by teaching it to others. If you’re spending hours every night in the library for one class you’re probably doing it wrong.

Also, your ideal study & homework time! I killed it between dinner and bed time but couldn’t find motivation earlier in the day. Some people do it right after class, it’s up to you to figure out!

Remember that you can’t teleport from one place to the next. Factor in travel time!

10 Steps to Prepare for Next Semester

9 Dec

Hannah Stewart, Purdue University Student and Peer Counselor
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

Okay, so it’s about time to make our schedules and pick out classes for next semester. As we move closer and closer to the spring here is a list of things to keep in mind while picking classes:

Is the work load realistic? It’s awesome you want to take 20 credit hours! Is it really that realistic to successfully complete 20 credit hours though? Be honest with yourself and only take what you can handle. Your financial aid, degree, and future job depend on you doing well so don’t set yourself up for a disaster.

What classes do you need? If you know you can only successfully complete 15 credit hours which classes are really important and get you closer to your goal, graduation? I know your best friend is in that class and you really want to be with her, but maybe that’s not the best option for you. And make sure you stay on track. Are you going to graduate on time? It can cost a lot of money if not. Make sure you are taking care of what you need to first.

What time is class? Some of us are morning people, and some of us are definitely not. No one knows you better than… you! Keep in mind part of your financial aid is contingent on participation, which for some that means attending class. If you know you’re going to sleep through a 7:30am class, perhaps there is a better option during a later time. You just might be able to substitute the 7:30am class for another credit altogether.  Check with your advisor for any class switches you could make.

When is lunch? When some of us make a schedule, we pack it as tightly as we can, to be done with the day as soon as we can. Others purposely leave room for a lunch. So look at what works best for you. If you have time for a lunch, packing a lunch is always cheaper. If you don’t have time for a lunch, maybe you don’t need such a large meal plan, see about switching it out for what works best for you and your needs.

feet walking upstairs with text overlay: 10 Steps to Prepare for Next Semester

How are you getting to class? Are you taking the bus? Make sure you check out the bus schedule to see when it starts, stops, if it is on-time, and plan accordingly. Difficult to tell when a bus is on time, there is an app for that. If you’re driving, are you sharing that car? Make sure you work it out with all the necessary parties.

Do you have scholarships? What are the GPA requirements for those? Most Purdue scholarships check your grades in the spring, and only in the spring. If you know you’re not where you need to be, consider taking some GPA booster classes or cutting your work load to get your GPA were it needs to be. Also don’t stop now! If you have a good GPA keep up the good work and don’t lose momentum.

What other financial aid do you have? State and federal aid have minimum credit hour requirements to receive those funds. Make sure you continue to meet those credit hour minimums. You can always see the requirements needed for all types of aid by going to your MyPurdue, look under the financial tab. On the left hand side there is a link that says “Award for Aid Year”. After you click the link you will want to select the 2013-2014 school year. On the award overview tab, all of your aid will be listed with links to the award requirements.

Is your enrollment changing? Typically, financial aid is based on the assumption you will be 12 credit hours or more. If you’re not, let the financial aid office know, before classes start! Re-awarding financial aid is a manual process. Letting the Financial Aid Office know about your schedule changes in advance will save you from headaches.

What are the additional costs? Some courses come with special course fees, like chemistry labs. Can you handle that other cost? All books are not created equal. Keep in mind some textbooks will always cost more. So make sure you consider if the additional financial costs outside of the tuition will be covered. And plan ahead. Often times there are cheaper options for buying books.

Do you have a job? Most employers, especially the ones on campus, are good about working around your class schedule. They are here at Purdue and realize you are a student. That being said, they need to know your schedule. Make sure you give them your schedule and do so well in advance. The early bird gets the worm and the sooner they have your schedule, the sooner they can work around it and give you the hours you need.

What steps do you take to prepare for a new semester?

Schedules: Advice to Students from Students

9 Aug

Recent Purdue Graduate Words of wisdom to the class of 2017
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

I’ll be honest.  When you think of that girl in class who has her entire week planned out, even down to what meal she is going to cook on what night, that’s me.

My favorite two days every semester occur during syllabus week, a time when I can write every assignment from every professor for the entire semester.  For all new Boilermakers, syllabus week happens the first week of classes every semester and you review the syllabus in class … for most classes.  Take advance of this time while you are reviewing the semester’s assignments and due dates by completing your planner.

I love planning and I love schedules.  I like to think of my planning addiction as a type of goal setting exercise.  I write what I want to accomplish every week, and it’s not complete until I actually mark the line through it.  That’s actually another one of my greatest joys—crossing off tasks that I want to do after they are finished.  I honestly believe that without weekly goals, I would never get anything accomplished.

cartoon calendarWriting things down is a motivation for me because I hate seeing things in my planner that I didn’t get to cross off.  The feeling is comparable to my grandparents saying they are disappointed in me; it’s that serious!  This technique can also be used for long-term goals too, which is basically a glorified way of me saying I want to plan my work outs so I can get my high school body back by the end of summer.

It’s still the same concept, though.  I plan out what I want to do, week by week, to get to my end result.  It worked well for me during college, so I am more than optimistic that it will also work after college.

The things I’ve mentioned for goal-setting are fairly juvenile. I mean, it’s not like I am setting goals for my ten-year plan or anything, even though now that I think about it, I probably should start that soon.

The key aspects of goal setting I have learned through college and personal life are to be realistic with yourself. Don’t tell anyone how much you love to plan things.  Make sure your goals are attainable

Cartoon Family Portrait

photo by Yesenia603

for you, or else you will get discouraged.  It doesn’t make sense to say you are going to work out for three hours after you get home from work and then cook a five course meal.  That doesn’t even sound enjoyable!  And I’m really stressing here, keep your planning addiction to yourself because people love to mess with you.  They will start inviting you to things, like the bars when they know you have an exam tomorrow morning, just because they know that it will torment you and ruin your chances of getting your goals accomplished for the day.  Just do what I do, think to yourself: “what would my grandparents want me to do”… and you will usually make the right decision.

 

Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr … Indiana Weather

28 Jan

2007 Blizzard at Purdue University

2007 Blizzard at Purdue University

Hannah Stewart, Purdue University Student and Peer Counselor
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

Whether we like it or not the weather is getting COLDER! This is nothing new for Hoosiers, as the weather changes constantly. Pretty soon, there will be snow on the ground, ice will sneak in, the roads will be hard to drive on and everyone will miss the good ole days of high school when we had two hour delays and snow days. With bad weather comes the temptation of skipping class. I mean, who Family of Snuggies around a firewouldn’t love just sitting at home, snuggled in a blanket (or a Snuggie thank you QVC) with hot chocolate? Here are a couple reasons why this is a bad idea.

First and foremost we are here to be students. Part of being a student is going to class and doing well. This can be hard to do if you keep missing lectures. I know that there are online notes, a class book and of course Google but that doesn’t mean you can use them as a crutch.  Professors often mention valuable things in class that are not cover in online notes, the book, or could be found with a Google search. This is important to note because if your grades start to slip it could cost you more than just that ‘A’. In the end, if your grades fall far enough they can affect your financial aid and even a job opportunity. Part of financial aid is

Professor Morrison Purdue University

making sure you’re participating in class, which some professors do by attendance. Financial aid is also dependent on making Satisfactory Academic Progress towards your degree. So make sure you’re successfully participating.

Unfortunately, in the real world, there are not snow days and two hour delays. Although it stinks, college really is preparing for life after graduation. Excuses like “the weather stunk so I didn’t come in” will not impress your boss and some businesses might not even understand the reason of the roads being bad. A lot of employers think that you should have the foresight and planning to handle this so it doesn’t become a problem. So, although staying at home is much more inviting, we do need to get up and get going even when it is FROZEN outside.Frozen Campus Missouri

Then there is the issue of clothing. You spent how much on those snow boots, winter coat, gloves, hat, and scarf? Are you really just going to let that be a waste? And what about that scarf grandma knitted with all her love for you? Don’t let them be in vain, use them! Now it’s okay to miss a day or two. I mean everyone gets sick (your peers will thank you for staying home) and there are definitely times we just cannot go in. We just can’t make a habit of it. So as much as it stinks, it’s time to put on a jacket and brace for the cold as we head out.

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