Tag Archives: 15 to Finish Indiana

Save Money & Time: Take 15 Credits!

28 Apr

Casey Doten, Financial Aid Administrator

One of the best things you can do for yourself in college is keeping yourself on track to graduate on time. Only 3 in 10 students in Indiana finishing their Bachelor’s degree within 4 years and that creates financial challenges for students who fall behind on graduation. Not averaging 15 credits per semester puts you off of a 4 year graduation plan which comes with a host of potential issues.

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First and foremost is the cost of attending one extra year of college. An extra year at Purdue costs an extra $10,002 for in-state tuition ($28,804 for nonresident). Not to mention the costs of housing, food, books and other school supplies, and the cost of travelling home a few times per year. All in all, the estimated cost to be a Purdue student is $23,032 each year ($41,994 for nonresidents). That’s a lot of extra money to spend for the same degree that can be obtained in four years.

Remember: tuition at Purdue is at a flat rate for anyone taking 8 or more credits hours, so whether you’re attending part-time with 8 credits or are registered for 18 credits, the cost is the same!

If the extra tuition expenses isn’t enough of a downside for taking more than 4 years, the extra year lost also gives a couple other undesirable effects:

More time for student loan interest to accrue:
If you had borrowed all the $27,000 available to you in Federal Direct Loans for your first four years your balance on those loans would increase from $1,080 with an extra year of interest to accrue (assuming a 4% interest rate). This isn’t even considering any extra borrowing for the additional time or the interest that accrues during the repayment portion of the loan.

Lost wages and retirement: NerdWallet recently did a study into the impact of taking extra years to graduate. One extra year would result in approximately $46,355 in lost income and $82,074 in lost lifetime retirement savings!

Adding up the tuition paid, lost wages and retirement savings equals an incredible $138,431 for the extra year to get the degree ($157,233 for nonresident). Obviously this is not an ideal situation, so here are some tips to help keep you on track for graduating in four years!

So what can you do?

Take 15 credits every semester! Almost all degree require 120 credits which smoothly divides into eight semesters of 15 credits. While it might be tempting to take less credits your first semester or two, you’ll have to make those up another semester which you may regret when you’re taking those extra credits along with upper-level courses. Plus, students who start out at 15 credits per semester are more likely to graduate.

It may be obvious, but it’s important to pass your classes and earn grades that allow them to count for requirements. Many courses in your major or that you need for pre-reqs require you to earn Cs or higher to count. So contrary to what people may say, Ds do not really get degrees.

If you’ve fallen off the 15 credits per semester average, you can make either make it up during the summer or by taking extra credits in a fall/ spring semester. If the idea of taking 18 credits is a turn off, plan on taking summer courses! You can receive scholarships through both the financial aid office and the Think Summer office if you qualify.

Renewing Your Trustees or Presidential Scholarship at Purdue

7 Dec

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If you’re one of the lucky Purdue students to receive a Trustees or Presidential Scholarship, the thought of what you need to do to keep your scholarship may have come up. While these awards do renew automatically, there are some criteria you should know to keep your eligibility.

For starters, you need to complete at least one full academic year in the program (major) that you were originally admitted to. If you decide that you want to change majors, you will have to wait until after the spring semester of your first year or your scholarship will be lost

In addition, you need to maintain continuous full-time enrollment each semester (excluding the summer) with 12 or more credits or you will lose your eligibility. If you are taking 12 credits and drop a class to go below, this will put your scholarship in jeopardy.

While taking 12 credits keeps you full time, there is another credit completion mark you must hit. You must have completed a total of 30 credits at the end of your first year, 60 by the end of your second year and 90 by the end of your third year. Important to note is that transfer and AP credits both apply to this 30/60/90 goal as well as the courses you take at Purdue. This can give you a bit of a cushion, especially in your first year, to hit your 30/60/90 benchmarks. If you started at Purdue before Fall 2014, the 30/60/90 rule does not apply to you.

Along with maintaining full-time enrollment, you need to maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA. These grades are checked at the end of each spring semester and if your cumulative GPA is below 3.0 at that time, you will lose it. However, if you have lost it for one year you can regain it at the end of the next spring semester if your cumulative GPA rises above 3.0 again (assuming you meet all the other renewal criteria).

If you made it through your freshman year without transferring and you’re hitting your 30/60/90 goal while keeping your 3.0 cumulative GPA you’re probably well on your way to graduating in four years. Which is good, because the scholarships are good for up to four years (8 semesters) of eligibility. If you take an extra year or semester past that, you won’t have the scholarship to help out.

If you are participating in a Purdue approved co-op or internship that takes you away from Purdue, that semester will not count against your semester usage, credit hour completion totals, or 12+ credit rules. Due to your different pattern of enrollment, you may appeal to use a semester of your award during the summer. Summer appeals should only be used when you will not be on campus a total of eight fall and spring semesters.

Now, if you have been doing your best but fell short of one or more of these requirements, there is the option to appeal if you have extenuating circumstances. Keep in mind that high school was easy and college wasn’t so you got really into Netflix and sleeping instead is not considered an extenuating circumstance.

Looking for renewal information about other Purdue scholarships including the Emerging Leaders, Marquis, Purdue Achievement, Purdue Hispanic, or Purdue Merit Scholarships? Check out this link with details on maintaining those scholarships. You can also find more information on the Trustees and Presidential Scholarships as well as other Freshman Scholarships here.

A Procrastinator’s Guide to Making Your College Class Schedule

14 Oct

When you think of that person in college who is always on top of everything, has their classes for next year already figured out and knows every stop from now to graduation then you’ve basically described the opposite person of me. Organization and planning never came easy for me, not that I ever really cared much about it. However, as life got crazy busy for me in my last couple years of school I found that I needed some ways to keep my life together as I was figuring out the next semester’s classes come registration time. Here are some tips that can help fellow procrastinators plan their semesters.calendar-schedule-procrastination

Start off by checking out your degree plan (your myPurdue Plan) and what requirements you need to stay on track toward graduation. While there’s seemingly a million things early on, you tend to see the light after a couple years and the classes that you need to take later become fewer. Pro Tip: leave a few generals classes for your last year – they typically have multiple sections and are easy to schedule around that senior seminar class that is only offered once per year. Once you know what requirements you need to check off and what classes you might be interested to do so, it’s time to meet with your advisor.

Before you sign up for classes, most colleges force you to meet with your academic advisor. Even if they don’t, it’s something you should try to do. However, that’s not to say that it should be the first part of planning your next semester. Your advisor is much more effective if you come prepared! Having the previously mentioned wish list of classes and what objectives you have left using your myPurdue Plan worksheet will make your meeting much more productive and give you time for those other questions your advisor can help with, like internships and post-grad plans.

So now you know what classes you should be taking and have your other questions answered it’s time for actually signing up. The key here is knowing your life. Not everyone is cut out for 8 a.m. classes. If you’re going to skip for sleep rather than go, find a way to work around it rather than handicapping yourself. Try to spread out your difficult classes, both across semesters and across days of the week.

Also take into account your life outside of class. If you have to work, have an idea of what your schedule might look like. One of the positives of having an on-campus job is that they tend to be able to fit hours in around your schedule rather than trying to get you to do the opposite.

Plan on taking 15 credits every semester! If you take 12 one semester, you have to make it up somewhere down the line and that sets you up for a potential 18 credit nightmare. This will keep you on track to graduate in 4 years. Not staying on track for 4 year graduation has a whole host of potential issues that come up including the costs of extra tuition & lost wages from not working, losing state financial aid, and running out of federal financial aid  and 4-year scholarships.

Once you’ve taken care of the scheduling aspect, everything else starts to fall into place. You know your class times, you can figure out what time you’re busy with student organizations, you can fit in your work schedule and then everything else is left over for leisure, study, and class work time. Classes typically only take up less than 20 hours per week of actual in-class time. If you add that plus a mythical 12 hours of sleep per night, and 12 hours of work each day, you still have 52 hours of free time to devote to everything else (including homework) in a week. The key is finding a stable pattern that can help you take care of what you need. For us disorganized and unscheduled people knowing that you absolutely cannot procrastinate a project until tomorrow because your only actual time to work on it is today can make a world of a difference. If you have a relatively consistent schedule you can know this rather than being overwhelmed the next day because that paper is due tomorrow but you’re supposed to be at a club meeting tonight!

Other random tips:

Use ratemyprofessors.com to get an idea of what instructors are best.

Seriously, use a planner or calendar or something to put down when papers are due, when tests are, and other big events that could get in the way. I had at least half the crisis moments when I could actually see when I would have busy times coming.

Figure out your study style. Some people need to read and highlight, some people need to write and rewrite notes, and some learn by teaching it to others. If you’re spending hours every night in the library for one class you’re probably doing it wrong.

Also, your ideal study & homework time! I killed it between dinner and bed time but couldn’t find motivation earlier in the day. Some people do it right after class, it’s up to you to figure out!

Remember that you can’t teleport from one place to the next. Factor in travel time!

15 to Finish Indiana

3 Aug

Tuition. Books. Supplies. Parking. Housing.

Every year of college is expensive.

But on average, if you take 15 credits each semester, you’ll have an associate degree in 2 years or a bachelor’s degree in 4. And then, instead of letting the expenses of college drag on for years, you’ll be out in the world using your degree to jumpstart your career, get a better job, and earn more money.

 

Indiana’s 15 to Finish campaign is sponsored by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education in partnership with the state’s colleges and universities.

15 to Finish Indiana

16 Mar

Tuition. Books. Supplies. Parking. Housing.

Every year of college is expensive.

But on average, if you take 15 credits each semester, you’ll have an associate degree in 2 years or a bachelor’s degree in 4. And then, instead of letting the expenses of college drag on for years, you’ll be out in the world using your degree to jumpstart your career, get a better job, and earn more money.

 

Indiana’s 15 to Finish campaign is sponsored by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education in partnership with the state’s colleges and universities.

15 to Finish Indiana

19 Aug

Tuition. Books. Supplies. Parking. Housing.

Every year of college is expensive.

But on average, if you take 15 credits each semester, you’ll have an associate degree in 2 years or a bachelor’s degree in 4. And then, instead of letting the expenses of college drag on for years, you’ll be out in the world using your degree to jumpstart your career, get a better job, and earn more money.

 

Indiana’s 15 to Finish campaign is sponsored by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education in partnership with the state’s colleges and universities.

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