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Investing in Your Future Career in a Global Economy

8 Aug

Annette Benson, Communication Strategist – Purdue Center for Intercultural Learning

Recently, a student wrote to Purdue Confidential:

I’m a…student who has been on campus for a full year now, and, although I’ve made a lot of friends, most of them are from my same ethnic group. Don’t get me wrong: I’m a pretty outgoing guy; I like to meet new people and make friends, but I just can’t seem to bridge the gap and make more…friends. I do have some acquaintances I made through my classes, but we don’t really chill like I do with my other friends who are from the same ethnic group as me.

Intercultural Learning.jpg

When Purdue students begin their college career, it seems like four years will stretch on forever, but the college years actually go by relatively quickly. Before students know it, the time is up, and some goals were not reached. It is easy to miss out on creating intercultural friendships during the college years, and then, when it is time to work in a diverse workforce, regret sets in as graduates realize how valuable intercultural knowledge is to working in a global economy.

With the start of a new school year, let’s review some opportunities to strengthen intercultural knowledge and friendships here on the Purdue campus:

The Center for Intercultural Learning, Mentorship, Assessment and Research (CILMAR) (https://www.purdue.edu/IPPU/CILMAR/) offers a variety of learning opportunities for students to interact across difference:

  • Boiler OUT!—A cohort of 200 students, this program overseen by Carrie Anne Thomas, gives back to the Greater Lafayette community by performing acts of service and gives students from many different countries the opportunity to work side by side.
  • International Friendship Program (IFP)—Matching 600+ students a year with area families, Beth Tucker provides the opportunity for international students to learn more about the Greater Lafayette Area. Lest domestic students feel left out, Beth can also give valuable advice for how domestic students can reach out to international students, especially at the holidays./
  • One Community Grant—Providing up to $2500 to student organizations who provide a concrete plan for how they intend to co-create a program with a student organization different than themselves, the OCG is overseen by Leighton Buntain in the CILMAR office, along with colleagues from Purdue diversity centers.
  • Intercultural Certifications—Giving students the opportunity to improve their intercultural attitudes, skills, and knowledge, the CILMAR certificate programs are theme-based around leadership, community building, career enhancement, and integration.
  • Classroom Presentations—Intercultural specialists show up across campus to provide interactive and thought-provoking academic presentations.

Besides CILMAR, other opportunities for intercultural interaction can be acquired by taking part in activities offered by:

  • Diversity CentersThe Black Cultural Center, the Latino Cultural Center, the Native American Educational and Cultural Center, the Asian American and Asian Resource and Cultural Center, and the LGBTQ Center all are welcoming, inclusive places waiting to greet you, regardless of your identity.
  • University Residences Global—Beginning its seventh year of providing intercultural opportunities for students living within the residence halls, UR Global, under the direction of Wilfrido Cruz–offers a variety of outings with intercultural friends to learn more about our campus, the Greater Lafayette Area, and Indiana.
  • Boiler Gold Rush and Boiler Gold Rush International—Both of these fun and exciting programs overseen by the Student Success professional and student staff offer countless opportunities to reach out across difference from the first day of a student’s life on campus.
  • Diversity offices within the colleges—Every college has professional diversity and inclusion staff ready to assist students who want to get involved in intercultural learning within an academic or social setting.

Why should you invest in intercultural learning?

  • Intercultural friendships can be more challenging and rewarding than other friendships as students learn to negotiate difference in real world settings.
  • The career pay off can be enormous as alumni will be able to prove to employers that they are the candidates ready to succeed because they not only understand difference but celebrate it.

Our best intercultural investment advice: Before having a career and salary on the line, begin investing in your career capital today by learning the skills you need to succeed in a global economy while still in college.

Looking for a School Year Job?

3 Aug

www.purdue.edu/mymoney

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus.

I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the latest trends and enjoy a cup of Starbucks every few days? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans?

Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention. Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus.  If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Be sure to follow @Hire_A_Boiler on Twitter for daily tweets about job openings that were posted that day and other job searching tips!

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that hire students.

Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains. There are enough employers hiring at any given time, that if you want a job you should be able to find one!

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online BE CAREFUL!  Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam.

You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through the Better Business Bureau. A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring, or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring.

If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search!

Be sure to leave any job openings nearby or job searching tips in the comments! 

Looking for a Part-Time Job During the School Year?

13 Jun

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus. I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the random expenses that pop up, let alone some money for fun? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans?

Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention. Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! Employers often start lining up their new hires for the fall around late June, so the time to apply is approaching quickly. This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus. If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Start here for specific student employment options. Purdue University’s Student Employment website is a comprehensive job posting website with on and off campus opportunities. This site is especially helpful if you need to search specifically for a work-study position.

Are you looking for other employment opportunities on campus? Check out the different employment websites listed below.

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that prefer to hire students. Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains.

Remember, you can use the city bus service for free as a Purdue student! Even if a job isn’t within walking distance, it may be on a convenient bus route.

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online be careful! Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam. You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through BBB.

A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring.

If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search! Feel free to post any openings you know of in the comments.

So You’ve Graduated College: Now What?

3 May

Congratulations! You did it!

Graduated College NExt.jpg

As you’re taking your last finals, you can finally relax for a day before you start worrying about what comes next. You may have your future planned out perfectly, or maybe you were so focused on finishing you have no idea what comes next. Either way, that’s okay!

Searching for Jobs

The number one thing on most people’s mind post-college is the job search. The most common question during the job search: Which Jobs Should I Be Applying For? Between those tips and our Job Searching Pinterest board you should be good to go for all of your resume, cover letter and interviewing needs!

Where you live may be determined by your job search, or it might be the other way around! If you’re not sure where you’ll be laying your head, we help you weigh your options.

Student Loan Repayment & Forgiveness

Six months after graduation, your student loan repayment will come knocking. Even if you paid attention during your exit counseling, it’s likely you’ll run into questions you aren’t sure how to answer. Our first recommendation is not to panic, you’ll be okay!

You may be curious as to what your options are for student loan repayment and what might be best for you, but some inspiration from someone who is going through repayment might help your confidence.

If repayment starts to get away from you then you might have to deal with a default, which isn’t ideal but it’s not the end of the world.

If you became a teacher, you’ll probably want to check out the 4 loan forgiveness programs for teachers.

Grad School

Maybe instead of going into the working world, you’ve decided on grad school? Other than knowing your loans are going to stay in deferment (but gathering interest if not subsidized), you’ll want to stay on track of the graduate school application checklist.

Taxes & Credit

Nothing will make you feel more adult than having to pay taxes. But luckily your time in school has some tax advantages. Your school should provide a 1098-T form to use as an educational credit on your taxes for tuition you’ve paid, but once you start paying down interest on student loans you’ll also be able to use a 1098-E form!

Last, but not least, in the adult realm is credit! Luckily your student loan payments can help you build your credit. Understanding your credit score is going to be very important if you look into car loans or a mortgage for a house!

All in all, being in the adult world is pretty nice. You don’t have to worry about tests and homework, it’s a lot easier to find a nice life routine, and it’s a lot easier to have quality time with pets (or other humans). So use these resources well and make your transition into post-college as easy as possible!

Job Searching: Which Jobs to Apply For?

5 Apr

Searching for your first job out of college can be a daunting task. While it may seem like graduation is forever away, it’s actually right around the corner. Not only do you have to learn how to apply for your first real job, you have to figure out which jobs you even want to apply for. Between tweaking your resume and creating cover letters, you’ll quickly realize you can’t apply for every opening. With your limited time, you have to choose which jobs to apply for and what jobs end up being passed over. So here are five tips on figuring out which jobs you should be applying for.first job search post college advice.jpg

#1. Pick your priority

Figure out what your priority is when job searching. Many people won’t even consider job searching outside of the area in which they live, while others are looking for an escape. There are a lot of factors that go into figuring out which job you’ll want, and if you know what your #1 priority is, deciding whether or not to apply for a job makes it that much easier. Here are some different factors to help you find your priority:

  • Location – Many people are tied to one area due to family or their significant others. To them, relocating isn’t an option. Others would like nothing more than a change of scenery; therefore, relocating isn’t a problem.
  • Pay/ Salary – We all need money, but for some people the desire for high pay trumps all other potential priorities.
  • Opportunity for Advancement – Especially if it’s your first job, potential advancement opportunities can make a big difference, as you don’t have to switch employers for upward mobility.
  • Specific Job Field – This may seem like a given for your search, but if you found a job outside of your field that meet all your other requirements, would the field matter?
  • Benefits Package – Typically not the #1 priority, but flexibility, vacation time, healthcare, dental, daycare, or even student loan repayment vary greatly from one employer to the next.
  • Making a Difference – Not all jobs pay well monetarily, but instead rely more on the feeling of making a positive difference in the world.
  • Employer Size – Working at a major company has a lot of exciting benefits to some people. Or maybe you’d feel more comfortable in a smaller, more intimate type of setting?
  • Job Security – Getting that first job is no good if you are laid off right away. If this is your priority, you may be willing to compromise for a job with decent security.

#2 Remember, it’s your first job, not your dream job

If your first job happens to end up being your dream job, congratulations! For the rest of us who make an average of seven career changes in our working lives, the key to a successful first job is using it as a launching pad. Look for jobs that have advancement opportunities or marketable skills to help you propel yourself throughout your career.

You don’t want to end up in a job you hate, but it’s important to remember that this job can be a valuable experience to help land you your dream job down the road. This is especially true if you are leaving college without a lot of experience in your field.

Keep in mind that the salary will be entry-level, as well. Don’t be surprised if you’re not offered the median salary in your industry since you don’t have much, if any, field experience. If you do well, you can earn your advancement in pay or position by moving up within the company or with another employer.

#3 Know yourself

Before you accept a job, be sure that it’s a job you want and not one that parents, counselors, or friends want for you. Hopefully you have had enough life experience to know not only what your priorities are, but what equates to a deal-breaker for you. Does a typical 9-5 sound ideal or does working varied hours sound more appealing? Do you prefer to travel for work or would you prefer to be in the same location every day? Be sure it’s what you actually want or you could be back to job searching again before you know it. This job needs to fit your current lifestyle, not only the “what-if” scenarios you’ve considered for your future.

#4 It takes time (and it might be your job for a while)

Unemployment is not much fun after the first couple weeks, as concerns about being able to pay your bills—and eventually student loans—become reality. It takes time to fill out applications and tweak your resume for each job. Remember that until you find your full-time job, your job is to job search. It is exhausting applying for various jobs for eight hours a day, but it’s better than not being able to make your ends meet.

#5 Utilize your network

If you’re still in school, you’re going to want to take advantage of all those free lunches and other events put on to meet your professors and other staff. Not only do these people have connections outside of your college, they can also be great resources for the future. Talk to them and find out how they got their foot in the door! Don’t be shy about asking for an informational interview from these people. Many have a vested interest in seeing you succeed and will go out of their way to help you. Just be sure to make a good impression while you still can!

Need a Part-Time Job During the School Year?

16 Sep

www.purdue.edu/mymoney

broadcast-purdue

Are you worried you won’t have enough money to have fun while you’re on campus this fall? If your parents have finally gotten sick of you asking them for money, you might consider getting a part-time job on campus. I know, I know, being a student is a full-time job, but how else are you supposed to keep up with the latest trends and enjoy a cup of Starbucks every few days? Especially without racking up more debt than you may already have from student loans. Earning a little extra cash during the school year not only helps you financially, but as reported by Student Employment Services at Purdue University, working 8-12 hours per week may actually help in academic performance and student retention.  Probably because working students learn better time management skills.

Now that you’ve decided (or have been bullied into by your parents) to get a part-time job during the school year, START EARLY! This will give you an edge on everyone else searching for part-time jobs near campus.  If you want to work on-campus you have a variety of options, or if you’re willing to go off-campus, you will have even more options! To start your search for on-campus employment I would recommend you start here:

Start here for specific student employment options. Purdue University’s Student Employment website is a comprehensive job posting website with on and off campus opportunities.  This site is especially helpful if you need to search specifically for a work-study position.

Are you looking for other employment opportunities on campus?  Check out the different employment websites listed below.

Be sure to follow @Hire_A_Boiler on Twitter for daily tweets about job openings that were posted that day and other job searching tips!

Other options for employment near campus include the bookstores (either Follett’s or University Bookstore.) Also, there are plenty of restaurants and stores around campus that hire students. Just walking down the Chauncey Hill or the Levee opens more options for employment. There are plenty of restaurants there and a few shops that hire students. Make sure you get there early though; they often have to wait and see if their regular employees will be returning in the fall, so it’s good to get your name and face in their brains. There are enough employers hiring at any given time, that if you want a job you should be able to find one!

Can’t find anything there? If you are looking through alternative resources to search for jobs online BE CAREFUL!  Some online job postings sites may not screen their job postings and it could lead to a scam.  You can research the company’s track record and see if any complaints have been made through the Better Business Bureau. A safer option would be visiting a particular company’s website to see if they are hiring, or you could even call or stop by and ask for an application. Both West Lafayette and Lafayette have companies that hire part-time workers, and most of them are often hiring. If your job search isn’t going as well as you would like, don’t give up! Maybe you could work at Starbucks instead of that little coffee shop on Chauncey. If you have a close friend who works somewhere, ask if they can get you an “in” and have them tell their boss how great you are.

Good luck in your search!

Be sure to leave any job openings nearby or job searching tips in the comments! 

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