Archive | June, 2016

Finding Good Deals Without Being an Extreme Couponer

30 Jun final 2 - coupon - photo-1464374288807-174911d4adb9

By Lexie M. Porter, Purdue University student and Peer Counselor for the Division of Financial Aidfinal 2 - coupon - photo-1464374288807-174911d4adb9

Between your classes and extracurricular activities, there is just no time to become an extreme couponer. You would have to set aside countless hours of your day to search for coupons to cover the cost of your entire grocery list. This might sound feasible for some, but if the lifestyle of an extreme couponer isn’t for you, keep reading.

Below, you will find a few tips on how to take advantage of coupons and deals without wasting too much time.

Check websites for coupons

As a college student, you must be quite familiar with the internet. Many of you probably spend your entire day in front of a computer or smartphone. While you’re there, why not set aside some time to coupon browse? If you check a store’s website, you can generally find printable coupons that can be used  in store. This is a great tool to use if you plan on going to a specific location; however, if you know that you want a specific item, Retailmenot.com offers coupons that can be used at multiple stores. Just search an item and you will find a variety of coupons and promo codes..

Go to a store and pick up a weekly ad.

It’s okay if you didn’t have time to print off coupons at home. As soon as you walk into a store, pick up a weekly ad. While you’re pushing that cart up and down the aisles, browse through the ad. You’ll be able to find various coupons for the items you need. If an item happens to be out of stock, many stores can give you a rain check. With a rain check, you will be able to come back to the store at a later date and receive that item for its originally discounted price. Rain checks are great for items that you don’t need right away, but still want. Remember that items generally take about a week to be restocked.

Browse your Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest for deals.

It’s no secret that you browse through your social media at least once a day. So why not browse your social media for deals? On any social media website, you have the option to follow anyone or anything you choose. Try following your favorite stores and checking for deals on their accounts. If you follow a store on a social media website, you will be able to see deals in your feed. Since browsing social media is a part of your everyday routine, take advantage of this opportunity to find deals and save money.

Last, but not least, GO TO CLASS.

Did you know that if you go to class, you can save money? It sounds like a strange concept, but it is completely legitimate. Have you heard of the app Pocket Points? Pocket Points is an app that rewards you with deals if you go to class. Once you get to class, turn the app on and don’t touch your phone until class is finished. While in class, the longer you go without touching your phone, the more points you will earn. These points can get you deals from your favorite clothing stores or free cookies from Insomnia Cookies. So why not download a free app for free cookies?

Keep in mind that these are only a few ways in which you can save money while shopping. If you want to try something else, go for it! Do whatever you can do to save money in college and remember that saving money now will save you later

Where to Find Cheap or Free Stuff for your Apartment in the Greater Lafayette Area

22 Jun community yard sale

Lauren Walker, Purdue alumna
www.purdue.edu/mymoney

With August closing in and the new year of leases starting soon, it’s time to start prepping for your new place. Whether it’s in Purdue housing or an off-campus apartment, you most likely need to buy a few things. It’s easy to create a huge dent in your summer savings if you buy everything at full retail price. So buy used!  I’ve always been able to easily find furniture under $50 a piece every year I’ve been at Purdue. I’ve even gotten some stuff for free. Where, you ask?

clothes rack

1.      Thrift Stores    

PROS: It’s a one-stop-shop for small items like cooking utensils, dining ware and picture frames at a reasonable price.

CONS:  If you’re looking for something very specific, they can be hit or miss. Furniture and other large items are in slim choice at Goodwill.

WHERE:

Trinity Thrift Store
1224 Union Street
Lafayette, IN 47904

West Lafayette Goodwill
907 Sagamore Parkway West
West Lafayette, IN 47904
(First Saturday of every month is ½ price everything in the store)

salvage yard

Habitat for Humanity
3815 Fortune Dr.
Lafayette, IN 47905

2.      Garage Sales 

community yard sale

PROS: Extremely cheap prices. I’ve found many household items for less than $5 at garage sales. Furniture can be harder to find, but when you do, it’s very cheap. In addition, you can haggle with the owner for a lower price. I rarely have someone turn down a lower offer.

CONS: Again, if you are looking for a very specific item, you might have trouble finding it. You also might have to drive all around town hitting up different sales to get everything you need, and we all know gas isn’t cheap.

WHERE: Check out Tippecanoe CraigslistYard Sale Search, or pick up a Journal and Courier on Friday or Saturday morning for the classifieds.

3.      One Man’s Trash is Your Treasure

one man's trash is another's treasure

There’s a special kind of Senior Week here at Purdue. As graduating students move to full-time jobs in distant cities, there are countless free scores waiting by every dumpster, trash can, and curb side in West Lafayette.

PROS: Well for one, it’s free. But don’t worry; you won’t have to jump inside a dumpster. Many considerate movers will leave their perfectly useable unwanted furniture and appliances in a clean spot beside the dumpster.

CONS: Hey, if you’re willing to jump into a dumpster to dig deeper, I’m not stopping you. You just might get a little messy.

WHERE: Take a stroll or car ride around the student neighborhoods and see what you can find. Large apartment complexes will be overflowing with treasures.

4.      Craigslist

craigslist store front

PROS:  You can shop in your pajamas at home and the seller might even deliver the goods to you. Performing a quick search through the listings is the fastest and easiest way to find a very particular item for cheap. Remember to haggle down the price!

CONS: Setting up a time and place to meet someone for your purchase can be a bit of a pain, especially if they cancel at the last second. “Oh yeah, I forgot had dinner with the in-laws tonight. Can we do tomorrow?”

WHERE: The Lafayette/West Lafayette Tippecanoe Craigslist.

5.      Purdue Surplus

Ever wonder where all those abandoned bikes from campus go? They get shipped off to the Purdue Warehouse & Surplus Store in Lafayette! They specialize in old furniture from Purdue buildings, bikes, computers and monitors, and student lost-and-found stuff.

PROS: The prices are extremely cheap. I’ve gotten an exercise bike for $10 and a coffee table for $5 from the warehouse in the past.

CONS: The Purdue Warehouse & Surplus Store has odd operating hours – Mon-Fri  12PM-4PM. So if you’re only free on weekends, this option is out.  You also might be purchasing something you once owned.

WHERE:

Purdue Warehouse & Surplus Store
700 Ahlers Dr

West Lafayette, IN 47907

6.      Auctions

world's largest car auction

PROS: Bids on small household items are typically auctioned off by the box-full. Larger items like furniture are bid on individually, usually under $50, as long as it is not an antique.

CONS: Auctions can take up an entire afternoon if the item you want is at the end of the bidding schedule. Many auctions have expensive antiques for sale, making them useless for our purposes.

WHERE: Search online for auctions in the Greater Lafayette area or check the Journal and Courier classifieds section.

7.      Freecycle

Freecycle is an online email community to which you subscribe. Members post free items they have up for grab, from couches to clothes. How it works, you email the member who posted the item to set up a time and place to pick up the item. As a member, you can ask items you need and you will be emailed free offers from other members.

PROS: It’s completely free!

CONS: Freecycle works only through Yahoo! Groups, so if you don’t like to use Yahoo!  E-mail, you can’t use Freecycle. Since everything is free, things go fast. If you don’t have time to keep a watchful eye on the Freecycle emails, you might not move fast enough to get something.

WHERE: The Freecycle Network

It may seem tedious to think through every avenue to save some money on household items. But if you were to save even $100, you’ve paid for at least one textbook.

Is Owning a Car In College Worth It?

8 Jun

Ford Taurus

Having a car in college can lead to some really fun times. Cross country road trips in the summer, getaway weekends and nights out on the town are all easier for students who bring a car to campus. However, maintaining a car as a student probably costs more than you think. So, when is it worth it?

The Privilege of Car Ownership

There are many advantages to owning a vehicle as a college student. First and foremost is the flexibility and freedom a car affords. You’ll no longer be dependent on other drivers when you’re making plans – simply by having a car you have more say in what it you can do and what you want to do.  And, of course, your commute to campus is likely to be a bit shorter; so hitting the snooze button a few times won’t ruin your morning.

Owning a car in college can help you make and save money, too. Since you can commute a little further, you’ll be able to consider a wider selection of off-campus jobs. And with all that carrying capacity, you can tackle a week’s worth of grocery shopping in a single day. If your kitchen is stocked, you’ll cook more and eat out less (and all without hauling groceries on foot or by bus).

Car ownership in college also has benefits beyond daily usage. When you really want to get out of town, having a car will make it happen. This is especially true given how difficult it can be for college students to rent cars at affordable rates.

Important Auto Considerations

gas prices are expensive

Despite all the benefits, however, there are some important financial factors you should consider before you decide to own a car while in college.

Gas is expensive, and it’s going to stay that way. The average car in the U.S. consumes around $1,000 worth of gas each year. If you drive your car regularly, you can probably expect to fill your tank once a week. Before you commit to bringing a car to college you need to determine how much it costs on average to fill the tank and how often you expect you’ll fill it up. If possible, you’ll of course want to bring a car with good gas mileage.

Car insurance is another major cost you’ll need to factor into your budget if you drive during college. Premiums are higher for anyone under the age of 25, whether or not they are enrolled in college. The good news is that, on average,Indiana auto insurance premiums are among the lowest in the country.

You’ll also want to consider the cost of campus parking before bringing your car to school. Here are the Purdue rates for parking permits. You should also make certain you are eligible; this is determined by the distance between your home and the campus.

Finally, when deciding whether or not it’s worthwhile to bring a car to college, you have to budget for damages and repairs. The average car needs just over $400 a year in repairs, not including oil changes. You can save some money changing your own oil and rotating your own tires, assuming you know how to do so safely.

Cost-Effective Alternatives

So what are the alternatives to keeping a car at college? There are a number of great ways to get around in West Lafayette:

  • Public transportation: The bus system in West Lafayette is very interconnected with Purdue. The university is central to the area, meaning the bus system can get you to the campus Lafayette CitBusfrom almost anywhere.
  • Bicycles, skateboards and so on: Bicycling is a great alternative in West Lafayette, and many people make it theirmain mode of transportation. Skateboarding, rollerblading and walking are also options, especially if you live on or close to campus.
  • Zipcar: The local branch of this car sharing service is available to anyone over 18 and caters to Purdue students, faculty and staff.

The Bottom Line

Because car ownership is such a complex financial commitment, you’ll need to do extensive research before you know whether or not it’s a sensible investment. In a nine-month academic year, AAA reports that the average small car costs more than $3,000, including gas, insurance and maintenance; this doesn’t factor in parking costs and non-standard repairs. As a college student, you can’t afford to gloss over such a pricy and impactful decision.

Karla Lant is a life insurance writer for The Simple Dollar. She helps everyday people understand and master life insurance issues and questions. Lant has dealt with related regulatory issues in her work as an attorney and has researched and published on life insurance and estate planning. She has also taught subjects related to life insurance as an adjunct professor – she is currently an adjunct at Northern Arizona University. Here is her Facebook page

How to Have a Successful Move-In Day at Purdue

1 Jun

By Bryttani Watson, Residence Education Coordinator for the Honors College & Residences

MainJourney

move in day gateway-arch.jpgSummer goes by faster than you might imagine, so it’s important to start thinking about move-in before August rolls around. You’ve elected to be a Boilermaker, and to live on campus, which is a wise choice. It’s been proven that those who live on campus adjust to college life and persist to graduation at a higher rate than those who live off campus. All that’s left is to pack your bags, move in, and embark on a wonderful year at Purdue University.

Whether this is your first year living on campus or your fifth, move-in can be busy, and stressful if you’re not prepared. Here are some helpful hints to make your move-in a success:

1. Label Everything. From the box of books to the bags (and bags, and bags) of clothes, label everything with your first initial, last name, and room number. Having your items properly labeled will provide Boiler Gold Rush team leaders (if you’re a first-year student) with the information they need to deliver your belongings to your room, thereby avoiding any doubt or forgetfulness.

2. Pack Light. More than likely, you won’t be able to fit EVERYTHING from home in your new residence hall room, so don’t overdo it.. You shouldn’t need a 26-foot U-Haul. You can stock up on toiletries, snacks, and other necessities after you’ve moved in, so we suggest only bringing the essentials.

3. Review A Campus Map/Download the Purdue App. It’s important to know where you’re going as best as you can. You can check out University Residences’ Facebook page for updates on traffic and construction around town. There will be several signs, police officers, and staff members who can help point you in the right direction if you get turned around.

You can also download the Purdue app on your smartphone. It’s complete with a campus map, access to your myPurdue account and email, and other useful functions, as well.

4. Be Early. Be Patient. With nearly 40,000 students attending Purdue and 13,000 living on campus, West Lafayette and surrounding areas will be busy, so getting in ahead of schedule can’t hurt! Traffic can be horrendous, so try your best to be patient and allow yourself plenty of time to arrive on campus. At the end of the day, you can kick back knowing that you’re all moved in.

5. Eat Breakfast/Lunch Before You Arrive. With the time spent waiting in lines and moving everything into the residence hall, you will be tired and hungry, maybe even hangry. Eat a good meal before embarking on move-in and bring snacks, because before you know it, you’ll have missed second breakfast, lunch, and maybe even diner.

6. You Check-In. Don’t Send Your Parents or Guardian. University Residences needs you to be present. We have a lot of information to give you and it’s not your mom or grandma who will be living with us all year, it’s you! Plus, someone needs to stay with the car.

7. Bring Your ID. Ideally, we ask that you bring your Purdue ID with you, but if you have yet to receive your ID card, a driver’s license or passport will be sufficient. Be sure not to leave your purse or wallet in the car, or worse, pack your ID in a box somewhere.

8. Communicate. If you separate from your parents, make sure you have a game plan for meeting up later. Nothing is more frustrating than a full cart and nobody to tell you what room to go to (although, this shouldn’t be a problem because you labeled all of your items, right? See tip No. 1).

9. Don’t Be Afraid to Ask Questions. Staff could not be more excited that you are moving in and all they really want to do is help. From resident assistants to hall administrators, we want to make the move-in experience as stress-free and wonderful as possible, so if you need anything, please let us know.

We’ll see you in August!

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